Archive for July, 2014

Sinner

Maggie Stiefvater
sinnerSinner follows Cole St. Clair, a pivotal character from the #1 New York Times bestselling Shiver Trilogy. Everybody thinks they know Cole’s story. Stardom. Addiction. Downfall. Disappearance. But only a few people know Cole’s darkest secret — his ability to shift into a wolf. One of these people is Isabel. At one point, they may have even loved each other. But that feels like a lifetime ago. Now Cole is back. Back in the spotlight. Back in the danger zone. Back in Isabel’s life. Can this sinner be saved?

What are your overall thoughts?

Anyone who has spent any time on the blog, or any time with me IRL will know that I absolutely love Maggie Stiefvater ‘s (read my reviews here) combination of poetic prose, breath holding tension and tender emotive scenes( with or without kissing). While Maggie’s work just gets better and better, Shiver and its sequels will always have a place in my heart as the first Stiefvater books, and one of the first YA book series, I read.

The inclusion of Cole’s point of view was one of my favorite aspects of Linger (Shiver #2) and Forever (Shiver #3). The sharpness and acidity of Isabel and Cole’s interactions cut though Sam and Grace’s meant-to-be-together sweetness. Without Cole and Isabel’s feisty relationship the series could have become too clawing.

While I completely understood and enjoyed the ambiguous ending of the Shiver trilogy my one disappointment was that Cole and Isabel’s story felt unexplored and unfinished.

It won’t take much of a leap for you to imagine just how excited I was to learn that Maggie had created a companion novel focusing on Cole and Isabel and how delighted I was to finally get my grabby little hands on it!

I enjoyed dipping back in to the world of Shiver, however I was quite surprised at just how different Sinner is to the rest of Maggie’s published works. I was expecting Maggie’s brand of descriptive- bordering on poetic- narrative, sense of place, twisting turning plot and tear inducing tension. While these aspects were still evident, for me they took a back seat to the sheer force of Cole and Isabel’s personalities and their snarky, energetic chemistry.

While it still contained aspects of magical realism, Sinner had a much more contemporary feel. I have always been aware of the connection between Cole’s wolf and the self destructive, suicidal and addictive elements of his personality. For me it was a deeper layer of meaning in a series I otherwise took at face value as paranormal.

In Sinner the presence of Cole’s wolf felt much more like a devise used to explore Cole and his recovery than as a supernatural element in it’s own right. Maggie even goes as far as to explain the metaphor to the audience through the misinterpretation of Cole’s song lyrics.

What was your favorite aspect of the book?

While initially the style of the book was not what I expected it actually became one of my favorite aspects.

I rather enjoyed being swept away by the tornado of Cole and Isabel’s relationship, much in the same way that I imagine the authors usual style was pushed aside by the characters dominant and distinctive personalities.

While I don’t consider myself much of a mood reader (watch Faye talking about mood reading here), I am very much a seasonal reader. I am attracted to more contemporary, particularly romantic, reads in the summer. While in the cooler months I like nothing better than curling up with an absorbing fantasy series. So to this end, Sinner was a perfect summer read.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I honestly don’t think that I can pick a favorite. I adore Cole and Isabel in equal measure. I loved that although they both had issues to work through they didn’t undergo personality transplants in the process.

I am also surprised to find myself glad that Sam and Grace’s cameos were very, very brief and didn’t reveal much about them post Forever (Shiver#3). We had three books to explore Sam and Grace. Sinner was very much “Isocole” ‘s (do you think it will catch on?) book.

Would you recommend this book?
Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed it and I don’t see any reason why Shiver fans wouldn’t enjoy catching up with Isobel and Cole.

Summarise in one sentence(verdict).
While not a “typical” Maggie book it is classic Cole and Isabel.

Reviewed by Caroline

Publisher: Scholastic
Publication Date: July 2014
Format: ARC
Pages: 464
Genre: Magical realism, Romance
Age: YA
Reviewer: Caroline
Source: Book Expo America
Challenge: None
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#CountDownTo7th August : Interview With Emma Carrol

Big Book Little Book are absolutely delighted to host author Emma Carroll as she counts down to the August 7th release of her second novel The Girl Who Walked On Air . The Girl Who Walks On Air is a beautifully written middle grade novel which perfectly balances breath holding daredevilry and adventure with a compelling personal mystery.
TGWWOAAbandoned as a baby at Chipchase’s Travelling Circus, Louie dreams of becoming a ‘Showstopper’. Yet Mr Chipchase only ever lets her sell tickets. No Death-Defying Stunts for her. So in secret, Louie practises her act- the tightrope- and dreams of being the Girl Who Walked on Air. All she needs is to be given the chance to shine.
One night a terrible accident occurs. Now the circus needs Louie’s help, and with rival show Wellbeloved’s stealing their crowds, Mr Chipchase needs a Showstopper- fast.
Against his better judgement, he lets Louie perform. She is a sensation and gets an offer from the sinister Mr Wellbeloved himself to perform in America. But nothing is quite as it seems and soon Louie’s bravery is tested not just on the highwire but in confronting her past and the shady characters in the world of the circus . . .

Both TGWWOA and your debut, Frost Hollow Hall, are set in the Victorian era. What is it about historical fiction and this time period that inspires you?

To me, historical fiction gives you freedom to put characters in situations that wouldn’t occur nowadays- a 13 year old walking a tightrope without a safety harness, for instance. There weren’t health and safety laws, crash helmets, antibiotics. Danger is everywhere in historical fiction!

Reading your work you really get a feel for the Victorian era, but without feeling like you are being given a history lesson. It is obvious you have had to undertake a great deal of research in order to get the setting of your books just right. What is your favourite fact/ piece of research about the era that you didn’t include in your work?

When researching ‘Frost Hollow Hall’ I found out about post mortem photographs, where people had their picture taken with a loved one who’d just died. It was one of many Victorian grieving rituals which to us seem creepy, but at the time were a popular mark of respect. For The Girl Who Walked On Air I loved reading about Charles Blondin. I had no idea he’d cooked an omelette on a tightrope over Niagara Falls! What a nutter!

On the surface Frost Hollow Hall and TGWWOA are two very different novels. Where do you find your inspiration for such varied subject matter?

‘Frost Hollow Hall’ was inspired by my love of snowy winters and stories set in creepy old houses. I’d like to say ‘The Girl Who Walked On Air ’is inspired by my talent for tightrope walking, but I’d be lying, sadly. One day I was looking at pictures of C19th circuses. It got me wondering what would motivate someone to risk their life every day just for entertainment.

Both of your published works feature very determined young women. What do you think Tilly (Frost Hollow Hall) and Louie’s strongest personality traits are? What are their weakest?

Great question! I think Tilly’s biggest strength is her loyalty to Kit and to her family. Louie’s is her determination to succeed. She isn’t afraid of danger. Weaknesses? Tilly’s rather hot-headed and proud. Louie tends to get the wrong end of the stick sometimes, and she is a bit of a show-off!

Which of your Characters do you identify with the most? Why?

I recognise bits of myself in Tilly and Louie. I think I’m loyal to those I love. I can also be a bit hot-headed and jump to the wrong conclusion at times! They’re both much braver than me- I’d never walk a tightrope, or go up a pitch-black staircase at night. No way!

What is it that attracts you to writing fiction for young people, particularly for the 9-12 year old age range?

For the past 18 years I’ve worked as an English teacher, so I’m around young people a lot. That said, the age I write for is a bit younger than the age I teach. When I started Frost Hollow Hall, I wanted to write a good old-fashioned romp of a story, something that was engaging and uplifting to read. Faber pitched Frost Hollow Hall at the 9-12 market, and I’m so glad they did. School events with this age group have been awesome!

In Louie’s world the ultimate achievement is to become a showstopper. In order to achieve this dream Louie has to maintain her belief and self-confidence in her abilities in the face of external criticism and indifference. Gabriel’s struggles however are internal. He has to face his fears, fears exacerbated by his past experiences. For you how much was writing and publishing a novel about grit and determination in the face of external obstacles and how much was about facing your own internal obstacles?

Interesting question! Writing involves determination. It takes time. It can’t be rushed. Yet it has to fit in around a day job (for me, anyway) and family life. It is hard work- like always having homework, I heard someone once say! But I’d not change it for the world.

Like Gabriel in’ The Girl Who walked On Air’, I think most writers face internal struggles. Not a day goes by where I don’t think ‘ ugh that’s a terrible chapter/scene/sentence’ and when other people say it…well…it can hurt a bit. But at some point you do have to take a deep breath and let go.

Did you have to overcome any personal challenges in your quest to become an established author?

The hardest thing has been juggling a job I find challenging with one I’m desperate to spend more time doing. I’m still so new to all this, so ask me again in a few years time.

IN TGWWOA there is certain level of audience expectation that the circus performers continually push themselves to create and perform more daring stunts. While I’m sure that your publishers didn’t expect you to risk life and limb for the cause, how has your experience of writing a second novel differed from your debut?

Ha ha luckily no they didn’t! Writing The Girl Who Walked On Air to a deadline gave me my first real flavour of writing professionally ie less staring out of windows/checking twitter, more getting words down. I felt I understood the process of crafting a book better so when the editing began, I didn’t quite feel so overwhelmed.

Louie spends many years perfecting her craft before she is ready to share it with the world. Do you have any secret talents you would like to share with us? 😉

If I told you they’d no longer be secret, would they? 😉

While undoubtedly born with a natural talent, I loved that Louie did not just rely on her talent to achieve her dreams. It took practice, self-confidence, determination and commitment to the cause. In our society of instant gratification, reality TV stars and the desire to be famous for five minutes, how important do you think it is for young people, especially girls, to have positive role models like Louie in their life?

This is a very important question on a huge, huge issue. I’d like to think Louie embodies the qualities you mention, yet she’s also flawed. She has to work for what she wants, often doubting herself in the process. She’s an ordinary person doing extraordinary things. It’s vital for girls-and boys- to have positive female role models.

Who are your favourite literary role models?

I do have a soft spot for characters who defy the odds. Jane Eyre isn’t pretty or accomplished, but she knows her own mind. Katniss Everdeen isn’t privileged or highly trained yet she’s a survivor. Hazel Grace Lancaster is terminally ill and still manages to fall in love. It’s a satisfying arc.

Do you envision revisiting any of your characters? In particular, Daisy would love to know if you would ever write a sequel to Frost Hollow Hall?

You’re not the first to ask that question, Daisy! At the moment there are no plans for a Frost Hollow Hall sequel. But, never say never. In the final chapter I did deliberately keep a few story threads open…

Your debut novel Frost Hollow Hall is a ghost story and your current work in progress, “In Darkling Wood” (TBC) also appears to contain a supernatural element. What is it about the supernatural that interests you as a writer? And on a personal level would you believe in Kit (Frost Hollow Hall) if you saw him as a ghost?

As a child I loved anything spooky or ‘unexplained’- obviously, I still do! I think it comes with having an active imagination, the idea that we don’t ‘know’ everything and that some things are beyond our understanding.
Would I believe in Kit Barrington? Absolutely. I’ve never fallen into a frozen lake, but once when I was very ill, I had a dream about a work colleague who had just died. He sat on my bed and told me I was going to be all right. This was my inspiration for how Kit appears in Tilly’s dreams.

Are you able to tell us anything about your current work in progress?

‘Alice’s little brother Theo is dangerously sick. When a donor is found, he’s rushed into hospital for a heart transplant and Alice goes to stay with Nell, the grandmother she barely knows. Darkling Cottage is a strange old place, surrounded on all sides by an even stranger wood.

Meanwhile Flo is writing letters to her older brother Alfred. It’s November 1918. The war is over at last. She can’t wait for him to come home. There’s something in the wood she’s dying to show him. No one else will believe what she’s seen….’
The first wobbly draft is nearly complete.

emma carrollFrost Hollow Hall won The North East Book Award 2013. It was longlisted for the Brandford Boase Award 2014 and The Leeds Book Award. It was named a top book of 2013 by The Daily Telegraph, and was a LoveReadingForKids Book of the Year 2013.
When she isn’t writing, Emma Carroll teaches English part-time at a secondary school in Devon. She graduated with distinction from Bath Spa University’s MA in Writing For Young People. ‘Frost Hollow Hall’ is Emma’s debut novel for Faber. Her second, The Girl Who Walked On Air is out in August 2014. It is set in a Victorian circus. She is currently working on a third book based on the Cottingley Fairies story.
In another life Emma wishes she’d written ‘Rebecca’ by Daphne Du Maurier. She lives in the Somerset hills with her husband and two terriers. To learn more about Emma and her work visit her website here

Questions by Daisy and Caroline

countdownbuttonv2A huge thank you to Emma for taking the time to answer our questions. The Girl Who Walks On Air will be published by Faber and Faber on the 7th of August.
To learn more about the fantastic #CountDownTo7thAugust blog tour and to take a look at the full schedule visit the Count Down YA website here.

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Landline

Rainbow Rowell and Rebecca Lowman (narrator)
landlineGeorgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and Neal still loves her, deeply — but that almost seems besides the point now.
Maybe that was always besides the point.
Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her — Neal is always a little upset with Georgie — but she doesn’t expect to him to pack up the kids and go home without her.
When her husband and the kids leave for the airport, Georgie wonders if she’s finally done it. If she’s ruined everything.
That night, Georgie discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past. It’s not time travel, not exactly, but she feels like she’s been given an opportunity to fix her marriage before it starts . . .
Is that what she’s supposed to do?
Or would Georgie and Neal be better off if their marriage never happened?

What were your overall thoughts on the book?
Rainbow Rowell is an author I have enjoyed reading before. After finishing Fangirl, it quickly became one of my favourite books ever. Thus, going into Landline I was both excited and nervous, for I did not want to be disappointed by this amazing author. But, once again, Rainbow has written a superb book that I just fell in love with. It is super cute, has the perfect amount of romance – without unnecessary sex scenes! – and is just written so well. I was enraptured by this story and while there were a few issues I had with it – where was the rest of it? – I still enjoyed every minute of reading it!

What was your favourite aspect of the book?
The magical feel to it. This book reminded me a lot of Celia Ahern’s books, (which I love!), as they are contemporaries but also have a sparkle of magic to them, which Landline did as well. It really helped to make this book really cute and just a great read that I truly loved. It was a fantastic way to show Georgie’s life and her relationship with Neal. All I can really say is give me more books like this!

Who was your favourite character and why?
Georgie, by far, was the best character. As the protagonist this probably isn’t that surprising but I just really loved everything about her. She’s so hard-working, emotional, focused and human, that it is impossible not to love her. This book doesn’t paint her in the best light. She’s made mistakes and we see them and I found that so great about this book. She is a real character dealing with real problems and you can’t help but sympathise with her and want to help her.

What did you think of the audiobook narrator?
Loved her! Seriously! Her voice was really easy to listen to with a soothing quality to it. I could probably listen to her forever! She also managed to distinguish between different characters quite well as well, which really helped! I would definitely listen to more books by her, no matter what book she was reading!

Would you recommend this book?
Definitely! Over and over again! It is a lovely light-hearted read that I am certain contemp adult readers would really enjoy. It does have some emotional moments but essentially it is a book that looks at love and relationships and shows how amazing (and magical) it can all be. Especially when it’s right. (Of course, that doesn’t mean we don’t have to still work at it!) So, if you’re looking for a truly romantic book, look no further.

Summarize in one sentence. (Verdict).
An incredibly cute romantic story that will make you feel a whirl of emotions before settling on eventual happiness. A must read.

Reviewed by Faye

Publisher: MacMillan Audio
Publication Date: July 2014
Format: Audiobook
Length: 9hrs 6mins
Genre: Contemporary romance, magical realism
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Book Expo America
Challenge: None

To celebrate Faye joining the Big Book Little Book Team we are giving away one copy of Landline by Rainbow Rowell( Audiobook CD’s) to one lucky UK reader ( UK postal addresses only).
Winners will be notified by email. If no response is received within 48hrs of notification email BBLB reserve the right to select a new recipient.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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The Power Of Sloth

Lucy Cooke
the power of slothThe Power of Sloth is Lucy Cooke’s celebration of the sloth: the cutest, cuddliest, slowest creature on this planet. In the book she brings together some truly adorable pictures of baby sloths, literally by the bucketful. These delightful, funny pictures are accompanied by a simple text which tells you all about sloths and why we should protect them. We also discover all about the work of the Avarios sloth sanctuary, which, along with the ZSL EDGE programme to protect the pygmy sloth, receives some of the proceeds from this book.

I love sloths! This amazing book is jam-packed with cute pictures and amazing facts. This is the first book I’ve dreaded coming to the end of. Which was even more sad because it is only a short book.

Beautifully written with amazing photography, this has quickly become a firm favourite of mine, Just to pick up and dip into.
Follow all the latest gossip in Slothville , like when twins Sebastian and Viola get some very snazzy sloth onesies and find out which cuddly toy Mateo finally decides will be his bestie.

I met Lucy Cooke when I went to the Hay Festival . She even signed my book!

Lucy Cooke is a photographer, zoologist and presenter for the BBC.(And she loves sloths!)

Reviewed by Izzy (10)

Publisher: Franklin Watts
Publication Date: November 2014
Format: Hardback
Pages:64
GenrAnimals
Age: Middle grade
Reviewer: Izzy (10)
Source: Own copy
Challenge: British book
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Buddy Review: Say Her Name

James Dawson
say her nameRoberta ‘Bobbie’ Rowe is not the kind of person who believes in ghosts. A Halloween dare at her ridiculously spooky boarding school is no big deal, especially when her best friend Naya and cute local boy Caine agree to join in too. They are ordered to summon the legendary ghost of ‘Bloody Mary’: say her name five times in front of a candlelit mirror, and she shall appear… But, surprise surprise, nothing happens. Or does it?
Next morning, Bobbie finds a message on her bathroom mirror… five days… but what does it mean? And who left it there? Things get increasingly weird and more terrifying for Bobbie and Naya, until it becomes all too clear that Bloody Mary was indeed called from the afterlife that night, and she is definitely not a friendly ghost. Bobbie, Naya and Caine are now in a race against time before their five days are up and Mary comes for them, as she has come for countless others before…

Posted by Caroline and Faye

Publisher: Hot Key Books
Publication Date: June 2014
Format: ARC
Pages: 240
Genre: Horror, Mystery
Age: YA
Reviewer: Caroline and Faye
Source: Provided by publisher
Challenge: British book
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#CountDownTo7thAugust

countdownbuttonv2After the phenomenal success of the Count Down To 5th June Blog tour, those crazy kids Jim (YA Yeah Yeah) and Daphne (Winged Reviews)of CountDown YA are at it again! This time they have put together a small but perfectly formed tour of fifteen stops around the blogosphere.

On the 25th of June we will be hosting an interview with Emma Carroll, author of Frost Hollow Hall, as she counts down to the August 7th release of her newest Novel, The Girl Who Walked On Air.

You can check out the full schedule on the Count Down website (here)

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After the Fall

Charity Norman
after the fallIn the quiet of a New Zealand winter’s night, a rescue helicopter is sent to airlift a five-year-old boy with severe internal injuries. He’s fallen from the upstairs veranda of an isolated farmhouse, and his condition is critical. At first, Finn’s fall looks like a horrible accident; after all, he’s prone to sleepwalking. Only his frantic mother, Martha McNamara, knows how it happened. And she isn’t telling. Not yet. Maybe not ever.
Tragedy isn’t what the McNamara family expected when they moved to New Zealand. For Martha, it was an escape. For her artist husband Kit, it was a dream. For their small twin boys, it was an adventure. For sixteen-year-old Sacha, it was the start of a nightmare.
They end up on the isolated east coast of the North Island, seemingly in the middle of a New Zealand tourism campaign. But their peaceful idyll is soon shattered as the choices Sacha makes lead the family down a path which threatens to destroy them all.
Martha finds herself facing a series of impossible decisions, each with devastating consequences for her family.

This was one of the most gripping stories I have read in a while and I dived into it at any available opportunity. Having bought the book quite a while before I read it, I had completely forgotten what the blurb had to say and for me this made it an even more exciting read as I was torn between the characters and as situations unfolded themselves without expectations about what was going to happen. Now I feel that I can’t talk too much about the plot because my experience of reading it with no fore knowledge is what I would recommend to everyone!

So what I will say is that I really liked Martha. She was a complex character facing increasingly difficult choices in her family life. Having a blended family she struggles between her loyalty to her older daughter and her new husband and twin boys. There are demons hiding in the closet too and as the plot twists and turns Martha struggles to make sense of what is happening to her family and what she can do about it to make things better. She so wants to make everything alright and it is easy to identify with her dilemmas.

I also enjoyed the realism in the story, cutting between the present where Martha is sitting beside a comatose Finn in his hospital bed and the story of how they came to be there, beginning with their move from England. They all seem like a normal family, ok, with a few issues, but really, what family doesn’t have any of those! The task of moving to another country, the other side of the world are covered briefly and the family settle into what seems to be an idyllic new life in New Zealand. The cracks appear slowly, and it takes a while for Martha to realise, and then come to terms with what is really going on. That desire to not want to face reality, to protect others and to believe that the worst is over are all things any parent can identify with.

The descriptions of New Zealand were beautiful and appreciated the way that Charity also wove in characters from a Maori background and used their legends in her story telling.

Verdict: This is a riveting family drama and it left me thinking about it for a long time afterwards.

Reviewed by Helen

Publisher: Allen and Unwin
Publication Date: November 2012
Format: eBook
Pages: 357
Genre: contemporary, suspense, family
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Helen
Source: Own copy
Challenge: None
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Cover Reveal: All Broke Down

We are so excited to get to share the cover for Cora Carmack’s ALL BROKE DOWN today! A New Adult Contemporary Romance, and published by William Morrow-an imprint of HarperCollins, this is the second book in her Rusk University Series, and it is set to be released on October 28, 2014! But you can pre-order it NOW! Check out what it’s about and then fall in love with this gorgeous cover!

brokedown_coverIn this second book in New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Cora Carmack’s New Adult, Texas-set Rusk University series, which began with All Lined Up, a young woman discovers that you can’t only fight for what you believe in . . . sometimes you have to fight for what you love
Dylan fights for lost causes. Probably because she used to be one.
Environmental issues, civil rights, corrupt corporations, and politicians—you name it, she’s probably been involved in a protest. When her latest cause lands her in jail overnight, she meets Silas Moore. He’s in for a different kind of fighting. And though he’s arrogant and infuriating, she can’t help being fascinated with him. Yet another lost cause.
Football and trouble are the only things that have ever come naturally to Silas. And it’s trouble that lands him in a cell next to do-gooder Dylan. He’s met girls like her before—fixers, he calls them, desperate to heal the damage and make him into their ideal boyfriend. But he doesn’t think he’s broken, and he definitely doesn’t need a girlfriend trying to change him. Until, that is, his anger issues and rash decisions threaten the only thing he really cares about, his spot on the Rusk University football team. Dylan might just be the perfect girl to help.
Because Silas Moore needs some fixing after all.

To find out more information on the Rusk University series and to pre-order a copy visit Amazon, Barnes and Noble or iTunes

HeadshotCora Carmack is a twenty-something writer who likes to write about twenty-something characters. She’s done a multitude of things in her life– boring jobs (like working retail), Fun jobs (like working in a theatre), stressful jobs (like teaching), and dream jobs (like writing). She enjoys placing her characters in the most awkward situations possible, and then trying to help them get a boyfriend out of it. Awkward people need love, too. Her first book, LOSING IT, was a New York Times and USA Today bestseller.

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Izzy’s journey with 500 words!

On Friday the 30th of May my family and me went to the Hay Festival, the reason why: I had got into the final of Radio 2’s 500 words competition (very unexpectedly). We were invited to attend the outside broadcast at the Hay Festival of the Chris Evans breakfast show where they announce the top 3 winners in each category. You could read my story on the 500 words website, if you want to…it’s under the top 50, 10 to 13 year olds. The night before the final we stayed in a hotel, we didn’t have much sleep that night because me, Mummy , Daddy and Daisy were very excited, not to mention Daisy accidently setting her alarm off at 2.15am! We had a very early start and were up and out quickly to drive from the hotel to a very muddy hay Festival.

hay1

When we arrived we had a 5 minute news bulletin to get in our seats. The excitement was building, my photo was on the big screen, the winners were announced… but sadly I didn’t win (but it was an amazing experience). Chris Evans was genius, it was amazing how he managed to engage with the audience, listen in his earpiece, remember when to cut back to London for the news, and keep an eye on the time all at once.

hay2
After it was over, I got to meet the superstar readers including Barney Harwood , Paloma Faith , Dick and Dom , Benedict Cumberbatch , Matthew Lewis , Hugh Bonneville and Alex Jones. Mummy also got her photo taken with High Bonneville, about which she got a bit over excited (but it was her birthday!)

After we had finished casually hanging out with celebrities, had a bacon butty and collected our certificates it was time to explore the rest of the festival and Hay town
It was an amazing day, I went to a seminar by Michael Morpurgo, my favourite author. I also met Lucy Cooke the author of The power of sloth. We spent the afternoon exploring the town. When we were eating lunch we saw Benedict Cumberbatch which was very exciting! The town was made up mostly of bookshops and we spent a particularly long time in one that was an old cinema. It was cool.hay3

Before we started the 4 hour journey home, we watched the live broadcast of The One show from the festival, you may have seen us, we were just behind Chris Evans head! So many people were impressed. Even the local newspaper wrote about Izzy’s 500 word story glory. I had a great experience and really enjoyed myself and all because of the Giraffe who never gave up!

Posted by Izzy (10)

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Bookish Brits: Excuses and Summer TBR

Posted by Caroline

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