Archive for March, 2019

Dino Knights

Jeff Norton
Imagine medieval times where the dinosaurs never went extinct. When dinosaur stable boy Henry Fairchild stops a vicious T-Rex from attacking his master, he is invited to join the most elite group in Brecklan, the brave Knights of Panterra, the Dino Knights. But before he can prove himself, the enemies of Brecklan attack with a flock of pterodactyls and kidnap Lord Harding. Whether he’s ready or not, Henry and the Dino Knights mount a daring rescue mission…but nothing is what it seems.


Dino Knights by Jeff Norton; Cover Reveal

Today we’re sharing the cover to Jeff Norton’s new book, Dino Knights! The book is being released on 6th June 2019 and you can pre-order a copy here: Awesome Reads Pre-Order.

Cover of Dino Knights

We hope you’re as excited about this book as we are!

Publisher: Awesome Reads
Publication Date: June 2019
Format: Paperback
Genre: MG Adventure
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: N/A
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Uthan

Uthania Jackson
image of Uthan Book Cove
Follow the adventures of Uthan as he goes on his first holiday and encounters the magic of a world under the sea.
Mum, Uthania, was inspired to write this story after discovering video selfies of Uthan after they came back from their holiday together.


A Lovely Read

This is a really lovely read about a boy who goes on holiday and is told that he will be able to spend some time with turtles. It starts with how excited he is to be going and what he needs to pack and ends with how much he loved his holiday and cannot wait to go back. It’s a simple story that I think many children will like and it’s a good book to have a conversation about holidays and trips out. I can definitely see many children and adults reminiscing about their own journeys that they’ve been on and really enjoyed.

The illustrations are a nice mix of handdrawn and computerized which brings a nice feel to the book overall. It makes it nice and easy to see what is going on as well. I definitely think that the colours jump off the page nicely. The illustrations are very pretty and would definitely appeal to children. I would definitely recommend this book.

Uthan Book Tour Banner

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: March 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 18
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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Armour Piercing

Peter Aengenheister

A defecting Russian space scientist, awaiting debrief, is in a Warwickshire safe house that comes under attack by an assassination squad. He escapes with plans for a conspiracy involving key members of secret services across the Western world. The only person he knows in the UK, or could possibly trust, is Pete Armour, the man who was to be his de-briefer. Killed before he can reach safety, he has hidden the secret papers where only Armour could ever find them. Armour becomes the target when he and a female newspaper reporter find themselves thrust together and on the run from at least two secret service agencies and British Intelligence, who seem more hell bent on killing him than helping him. And there is a price to pay. There’s always a price to pay. This is the first of the Armour trilogy. A gripping read. Fast-paced, a thriller packed with action, twists and turns.


Peter Aengenheister’s Favourite Spy Thriller Books

I tend to go by authors rather than individual books… Frederick Forsyth, John le Carre, Tom Clancy and Ken Follett…. All the usual suspects, but I also really like the Shardlake Series by C.J. Samson, and I have to say I am slightly influenced by Wilbur Smith too.

It’s all in the detail!

So, it is fair to say that I like a story that builds and is as authentic as possible in its facts and plausible in its drama. It’s great to have a lead role character who is facing the odds and manages to come through it in the end by hard work or guile. The bigger their nemesis, or the odds stacked against them, the better.

I think all the authors I have mentioned above follow a similar formula, and in doing so they have created their following.

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: March 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 264
Genre: Spy Thriller
Age: Adults
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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Cries of a Dying Waterhole

Wa’qaar A. Mirza

It was that one fateful meeting in Arlington cemetery that started a chain reaction. The outcome that no one could predict. Covert operations, hostages, chaos around the planet, world leaders at loggerheads… and this was just the beginning. Can Harry Firstone – despite his colourful past – pull off a geopolitical coup that could bring change to the social imbalances across world? Just as the spinning plates of his emotions start to wobble with incredible consequences. Does truth have any value? And is there anything that money can’t buy? Politicians, media, bankers. We live in a world where we choose to believe in lies, but it’s in the dirtiest of swamps that beautiful lotuses bloom. This book is set to inspire you. It will make you get up and do something good. Let your conscience take you on a roller-coaster ride and uncover something you never thought you could.


What is your favourite thing about writing books?
I think it’s the fact that you have given life and personality to characters and then you are their puppeteer, you can do what you like and you are the master of their destiny. You can give them flaws as well as powers. But I suppose the most favourite thing is transforming the readers into another world, your world. That’s fun, taking people on a journey that you control giving them enjoyment.

Who is your favourite character in your book and why?
It has to be Jon, the protagonist. He has so many personal issues and his complex personality and still remains focussed in his challenges and goals. He is real and has the weaknesses that any human has often not found in hero characters. That’s what I like, a sensitive person, but who sees the bigger picture

What is your favourite drink to consume while writing?
I really like jasmine tea and mint tea one they are both good for you, (but you need to drink more water) and second it’s quick and easy to make and available everywhere you go. It’s not heavy and you can have several cups without doing any damage to your health, I always add a slice of lemon and sometimes honey. Never add honey to boiled water, its bad.

Do you have any bad habits while you’re writing?
Yes, I am sure we all do. I check my emails and take calls, it’s bad I know and does break the thought; I am getting better and with my work, is hard to lock your self away for a day.

How do you research your books?
I have travelled very much and worked in the circle of political elite and ultra rich, this has helped. I read many journals and articles and books on poverty, on actions of the government. I think I subscribe to around 8 major journals like the Harvard Business review, National Geographic, New Philosophy and many others. I did a lot of reading on the all subjects in the in book and looked at the issues facing the planet form the views of the best in the world, such as Monbiot, Rosling, Franklin, Bartlett and Chomsky to mention a few. Spent 3 months just reading about why we are in this mess in the world. Spoke to bankers, politicians, and other professionals. Can’t find any novels on my subject that I wrote about, it’s unique. I spent time with philanthropy movements to get their take on things.

Are you a plotter or a pantser?
I think I am a plotter, I have a game plan, I know where the book and readers are going, but sometimes you just go for it in a chapter and your imaginations just runs wild, I guess like most writers your both depending how you feel that day, but very strategic in writing.

If you could live in any fictional world, which would you choose and why?
Well I love the ‘back to future’ films, I think the ability to go back and forth in time is crazy, just imagine how much good and bad could be done, must be the most amazing experience ever. I could spend a day in the land of pharaohs and then a day with the greatest people lived. I would love to interview those that have made and ruined this planet. May be giving them some ideas.

If you could befriend any fictional character, who would you choose and why?
Robert Langdon, Dan Brown’s books. He is all I would like to do, combine science, art, history, politics etc. etc. Really is an amazing, solving problem with just a thread of history. The ability to solve problems under pressure is a skill I love and have I think.


Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: February 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 300
Genre: Fiction
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Faye
Source: N/A
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The Secret Life of Moles

Liz Burgess

Liz Burgess has always held a keen interest in nature, especially small furry mammals!
Long fascinated by their secret activities at home in her own back garden, and the fields surrounding it, she decided to explore this special underground world, and find out more about moles and their other little friends. Liz Burgess lives in South Yorkshire and The Secret Life of Moles is her first book for children.


This is a wonderfully written story about a mole who wants to find a new home but comes across an issue straight away. Unfortunately his home is in the middle of a garden owned by humans and they do not like the mole hill he creates. Thus to ensure that the moles disappear, they put a hose into the hole to wash the moles away. Undettered, the mole returns to the garden the next night and talks to his friend, the Hedgehog and asks if he knows what happened. The story unfolds to leave lots of wildlife animals helping the moles create a new home for themselves in the garden so that the humans do not try and wash them out again!

It’s a lovely story of friendship and teamwork. I loved the fun descriptive words the author has used for the different animals that you come across too – such as house tigers for cats and barking tigers for dogs! It’s laid out in a very child-friendly way. However, with very little pictures – and the ones that are there being black and white – I would believe this book is better for an older audience, perhaps children who are just thinking about learning to read themselves or who want longer picture books as the story is also quite wordy. So probably perfect for kids between 5 and 8.

All in all, I definitely recommend this book as even as an adult I really enjoyed the story and I am positive that children will enjoy it too!

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: February 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 40
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Childrens
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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