North

Lucas Ehrenhaus

After one of the most decisive warring campaigns in European history between Barbarians and Romance, the sheer possibility of a full-scale Roman invasion into Barbarian lands launches a lifelong recruitment process, which drives to the re-discovery of old mighty forces in the long forgotten North. The most apolocalyptic pan-tribal conflict amongst central and northern European natives will ensue.


Exclusive Extract

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: October 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 136
Genre: Illustrated MG
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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Tigger’s Arrival

Jacqueline De Carteret

Sarah works at the animal shelter, and Tigger is a rescue cat there.
Sarah wants to take him home to live with her and her family. Will she be allowed to?
He could get up to all sorts, with the other cats. Harley, Midnight and Pumpkin.
Tigger is a real little character and loves having fun.
Come and join him and his friends, and see what they get up to.


All About Those Cats

This is definitely a book for cat lovers as it tells the tale of how a small kitten is re-homed with a family which already has three other cats. It’s an interesting story and should definitely help with children who are adopting cats for the first time or who just enjoy being around cats. Unfortunately, aside from the story of how Tigger arrives at the house and the things that he gets up to, not much else happens in this book so I’m not sure it will entertain every child. But it will definitely entertain those cat lovers and animal lovers for sure.

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: October 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 26
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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The Magical Sunglasses

Nicole McGrath

What would you do if you had one day with magical powers? This fun, bouncy read captures the imagination, and demonstrates the power of courage and self-belief. Inclusive book for early school aged children. Message for everyone.


A Vibrant and Wonderful Read

I absolutely loved this little rhyming story. It has a wonderful message at it’s core about inner belief – or what the book claims to be magic. It allows some children to put on some glasses to accomplish some of their fears that they have. Upon returning the glasses, the teacher admits that their is no magic to the glasses at all and that the children conquered their fears all on their own. I feel that this is a brilliant book to read to children and get them to talk about some of the things they’re afraid of and help them to use their own self-belief to conquer the fear. It’s also really well illustrated and rhymes in a way that simply rolls off the tongue. I give this one top marks!

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: September 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 20
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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The Shell Collector

Robert Lyons

1973: the year of the oil crisis, the secondary banking collapse, the three day working week and the collapse of the stock market. In a riotous ride through the City of London we meet the characters and events that filled the social and City pages of the press in that roller-coaster year.
Guy Magnus, an ambitious young share dealer, makes a daring takeover bid in the face of opposition from the City Establishment. Will he follow their rules, or his own: never to fall in love with a deal? Will he come to repent his challenge to the powers-that-be? Is Guy’s story fiction or fact? Was a Norfolk Broads canal boat really moored in the marina of Monte Carlo? Did a Henry Moore sculpture really become the most expensive work of art in the world? And did a bet for a lunch at Maxim’s for the first to make a million, Guy or his friend and rival Harry Griffin, bring a merchant bank to the verge of collapse?
THE SHELL COLLECTOR tells a cautionary tale of the City when its buccaneering spirit was at a peak. Whether true or false, it is never less than entertaining.


Interview with Robert Lyons

What is your favourite thing about writing books?
The private satisfaction of getting something spot-on; whether a description, an observation or a joke makes no difference.

Who is your favourite character in your book and why?
It has to be “Yankee” Tate, Guy’s driver. First, the name itself: almost all of my characters are named after Romans/Britons surrounding Caligula, and I was lucky enough to hit on Incitatus, the horse the emperor is said to have made a consul. Then I loved creating his down-to-earth perspective on dealing on the stock exchange. Where others in the story may have had questionable motives, he was straightforward, honest and loyal. Only a cameo role, but great fun to write.

What is your favourite drink to consume while writing?
I’m teetotal – don’t touch a drop before teatime. I know I should keep taking fluid while writing, but I am my late father’s child: “Water’s for washing”.

Do you have any bad habits while you’re writing?
Yes; I tell my wife I’m busy when she needs me. But she is very understanding, and quite forgiving.

How do you research your books?
In the case of The Shell Collector, the most important source of all was the official report of the affair, some 500 pages long, setting out more or less verbatim the evidence given to the Inspectors by various participants. This provided me with most of the detail for the financial side of the story.

I spent many days in the basement of the London Library trawling through back copies of The Times and The Daily Telegraph, both for information specific to my story, including share prices, and to put together a background diary so it could be set properly in its time (miners’ strikes, Watergate, Royal wedding). I also ploughed through back numbers of Private Eye, particularly the City “Slicker” pages.

Finally, I was able to persuade one of the participants to give me a couple of hours of his time to answer questions. Without his input I wouldn’t have been able to retell two of the more amusing incidents in the book.

Are you a plotter or a pantser?
Is it possible to be only one or the other? To the extent that I set out a calendar of events and dealings before I began to write, I suppose I’m a more of a plotter; but once I’m into a new chapter I tend to fly along until the time comes to put the mess into order. Certainly one of the best things I did was to take my editor’s advice to change the order of some of the early chapters. Did this make me a hindsight plotter or a bungling pantser?

If you could live in any fictional world, which would you choose and why?
What a question! It never occurred to me that such an option existed. I’m not sure I could have survived in the 19th century world described by my favourite novelists. I think I’d hate the inadequate lighting and the lack of the creature comforts of contemporary living, though listening to delightful young ladies playing the piano and singing prettily would have been some compensation. May I not just live in the here and now, please (despite the terrifying political mess that surrounds us)?

If you could befriend any fictional character, who would you choose and why?
If I chose Becky Sharp, I’d risk having my face slapped. Safer to go for Milo Minderbinder, who would make me a lot better off (financially) than my publisher ever can, and give me a fun ride on the way.

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: September 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 340
Genre: Literary
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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The Legend of Sidri

Rauf Khalilov

In the mythical realm of Badalonium, a young boy named Sidri lived happily with his beloved parents. But the family is shattered by an evil figure from the afar, triggering a series of events that lead Sidri on a journey of self-development, friendship, family reunions and retribution.


Rauf Khalilov’s Favourite Books

1. Sans Famille by Hector Malot.
As a child I read this book probably a thousand times. I like this book because it showed the struggles and sufferings of poor people in capitalist France and England. The protagonist was probably the same age as I and I could relate to him and his struggles. I also loved the fact that he was in the end able to overcome his impediments and triumph. Every story must have a positive ending.

2. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo.
I like this book for several reasons. This book was very popular in my household and I grew up with various elements that were taken from it. For example, my dad always called my oldest aunt Cossette. I had no idea why this was the case when I was a child. I only found out the reason when I read the book. Les Misérables is a book about human nature. It’s a book about injustice, human suffering and sacrifice. My most favourite characters are Jean Valjean and Bishop Myriel.

3. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
This is one of the first books I read in English. I was fascinated by it because it described the harsh realities of 19th Century England. I was fascinated by Dicken’s writing because he could describe England and the life of people there in such detail that I could picture it in my head. Years later when I arrived in England, I noticed everything I had imagined whilst reading Dickens was exactly the same.

4. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevski

A masterpiece touching on a variety of moral and existential issues. One of my favourite moments is when Raskolnikov bows in front of Sonia and kisses her feet. He says “I did not bow down to you. I bowed down to all the suffering of humanity”. Of course, this sounds much better in Russian.

5. Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam
I love persian poetry especially the ones by Omar Khayyam. I find Khayyam’s poetry very interesting because he talks about deep issues through poetry. As a poet I find this fascinating because I know how difficult it is to philosophise through poetry.

Publisher: Self-Published
Publication Date: September 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 50
Genre: MG
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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Whee to the Moon

Arron Charman

Neil is a young boy who likes to scream “whee!” with excitement when he’s at the playground. Neil develops a love of flying. As he gets older, he learns how to fly aircraft that will take him on many different adventures. Even though he is now a grown up, Neil still excitedly screams “whee!” as he gets to fly all the way to the Moon!


An educational read

This is such an informative and entertaining read. It follows the story of Neil Armstrong but not the one where we just know him as an astronaut, but the one that includes how he became an astronaut. It follows him as he is a little boy, all the way until he finally lands on the moon. He dreamt big and continued on working towards his dream until he finally made it. It’s a book that will hopefully help to encourage children to not give up on their dreams as if you work hard, there’s a higher chance they’ll happen. All dreams take work after all.

Add to that a wonderful science aspect and fantastic illustrations and I believe that this is a book that every child should definitely give a read. Definitely recommend!

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: September 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 34
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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Invisible Us

Dougie Arnold

Can you imagine being almost invisible? Well, that’s exactly what Gecko felt he was, so decided to set out on an adventure to find some new friends like him. Join Gecko on his journey and you will be amazed at the fantastic creatures he meets. Have fun trying to find them in this magical story.


A Wonderful Story

Invisible Us is a lovely picture book about creatures who become camouflaged in their surroundings or are too tall or large to have different kinds of friends. It is a book about how they all meet and become friends one day because they’re all feeling quite lonely as no one else can really see them. It’s a really charming story and one that I know many children would really enjoy. Before the animal appears, there is a page where it is hidden and it would definitely be a lot of fun to see a child try and guess what animal they can see on each page! It has a lovely moral story of being friends with people who are different to you – we’re all still lovely inside and want friends just as much as everyone else. To end it off, the book has a page for the children to draw their own animal friends which is also really fantastic to see in the book too.

I would definitely recommend this book and I think it would be one that could easily be read again and again but also one that a child could run away with and come up with new adventures for all the new animal friends to go on together!

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: September 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 40
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Children
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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Outremer IV

D. N. Carter

A great secret from antiquity is threatened; its eradication, if successful, will lead to mankind’s destruction. There can be no compromise in safeguarding it, whatever the fateful consequences to those entrusted with its continuation. Paul faces impossible choices, ones he cannot make alone. Who can he trust? How can he protect this secret as the world around him falls apart as Outremer descends into a deliberately orchestrated war of unparalleled violence, with Christianity and Islam pitted against one another? Amid the horrors of total war, Paul must decipher the secret, how it has been updated and encoded within the mysteries of Mary Magdalene and the sacred feminine, and how it must be restored if is to be preserved successfully so that mankind can claim its true inheritance, one of unimaginable power. Evil forces wish to control and destroy the secret to stop a new dawn of spiritual awakening, cultivating instead a climate of fear, anger, judgment and the eventual enslavement of our souls. Wiser, braver and nobler individuals step forwards, just as they have always done in the past to intercede against evil, and it is to those men and women Paul must turn. Just when all appears lost, Paul must find true courage, perseverance and faith, and make the ultimate sacrifice. Failure on his part will risk losing this arcane message forever. The time to act is now. Outremer IV is the final instalment of D. N. Carter’s epic historical quartet.


Top Five things about the main protagonist in Outremer

Paul Plantavalu.

He is the leading character within Outremer. Tall and handsome, fair haired with hazel eyes and of a quiet nature and disposition he was intellectually sharp, inquisitive and very much into the arts and architecture who placed honour, truth and justice above all things. He sought answers to what his real surname meant and why it was changed, Plantavalu not being his true identity. Paul fell deeply in love with Alisha al Komaty despite the many warnings he should not because she was from a Muslim family. Alisha was, in his mind, his world. His mother died giving birth to him but he learnt that his father was descended from Segisbert IV, son of Dagobert II and that all traces of their family were eradicated by the Roman Catholic Church. Paul was very much like his father Philip in both physical appearance and nature. Throughout Outremer being told, Pauls character is revealed as he grows from a young, somewhat naive and protected, some would say entitled and privileged upbringing, to manhood. It was not an easy path for an individual who sensed so much and felt things deeply…some would say too deeply at times to his own detriment.

1: He was a dreamer, in a very real sense, but learnt to use his vivid dreams that he would often experience to guide his designs, artwork and even actions in life. He became heavily influenced by several characters he came into contact with, three main ones in particular being Theodoric, Attar and Kratos. Kratos was a truly enigmatic and mysterious character who stood over seven feet tall. With blue eyes that appeared to have flecks of gold in them, similar to Alisha, he looked like a man in his early 60’s but with a full head of pure white hair and no flaws upon his white skin. No one had ever seen him ever look any different despite the passage of time. Living mainly in Malta, he was powerfully built and unbelievably strong and exuded confidence but also a genuine sense of warmth and kindness. He always carried a large staff and had knowledge beyond his time those who knew him would often claim; especially in the sciences and medicine. He would have a very deep and profound role to play in Paul’s life. Attar of Nishapur was a Persian Sufi Mystic famed for his poems. Abū Ḥamīd bin Abū Bakr Ibrāhīm, better known by his pen-names Farīd ud-Dīn and ʿAṭṭār which means apothecary. He was a poet, theoretician of Sufism, and hagiographer who had an immense and lasting influence on Persian poetry and Sufism. Manṭiq-uṭ-Ṭayr (The Conference of the Birds) and Ilāhī-Nāma are among his most famous works. Attar was the son of a wealthy chemist, receiving an excellent education in various fields. He initially practiced the profession of pharmacy and personally attended to a very large number of customers. The people he helped often confided their troubles in him which affected him deeply. Paul likewise was constantly affected by the people he helped and came into contact with…something he had to learn to manage carefully to keep his own sanity. Attar eventually, abandoned his pharmacy store and travelled widely to Baghdad, Basra, Kufa, Mecca, Medina, Damascus, Khwarizm, Turkistan, and India, meeting with Sufi Shaykhs and returned promoting Sufi ideas. He had a major influence on Paul’s studies and guided him wisely. He helped Paul learn how to interpret his dreams but also his growing insightful and spiritual abilities and how to trust his instincts. Then there was Theodoric. In his late sixties he was a wise esoteric maverick recluse who helped Paul to learn, but more importantly understand esoteric and exoteric codes. He also taught him martial skills of close combat. With a great sense of humour he wore an old habit and was rather pale looking and his weight often fluctuated between being thin to rather rotund, not fat as he would often argue…but always hungry. He was incredibly wise and insightful and imparted much of his knowledge and wisdom gained over several decades from many schools including Sufi mysticism and secrets of the Magi to Paul. He was a former knight with a mysterious past he kept close to his chest but Paul instinctively trusted him. Theodoric’s black sense of humour always came to the fore when he was in dire trouble with many funny comments and observations being made by him. Always calm and utterly unflappable he was an acknowledged great illusionist.

2: Paul was an accomplished artist being able to execute incredibly lifelike drawings of people and places. He drew many people in his time including some of the most famous names of the period from Saladin, King Guy de Lusignan, to Queen Sibylla of Jerusalem, Princess Stephanie and the infamous Reynald de Chatillon. He was even able to draw the enigmatic leader of the Ashashin, Al Rashid, the Old man of the Mountains himself. Paul felt that drawing people closely brought him a deeper sense and understanding of the person. But drawing in such fine detail and accuracy alarmed some people but also led to some very dire consequences later in his life as Outremer reveals.

3: Paul was fundamentally a very sensitive, kind and gentle soul…and consequently as a deep thinker his nature was at times often at odds to the scheming and violent world he found himself in. But it was Alisha who would galvanise his spirit to stand up and fight, to use extreme violence to protect his family and protect others in need when necessary; but this caused him a great personal inner conflict that he found hard to reconcile with the person he thought he was and his beliefs. As Outremer progresses Paul questioned everything he had ever known about Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

4: Having a genuine empathy for others he was naturally both loyal and courageous. Paul considered himself spiritual, not necessarily religious as he saw the two as being two totally different things. Totally believed in, and felt that all life was sacred and that humankind is inherently kind first and foremost and that love is the key to spiritually evolve. He felt that all of us are connected by the very nature of our eternal souls whether others believed in it or not.

5: Service to others before service to self was his overriding character trait. He was prepared to give up everything and sacrifice all that he loved and held dear for the long term benefit of humankind, especially when he considered with utter conviction from the things he had seen and learnt, that the information he was guarding for future generations and the planet we live upon itself, was ultimately for the very survival and advancement of our souls themselves…to guarantee we evolve. This is why he wrote down the codes of antiquity for future generations to rediscover when we again would recognise them for what they are. That generation and that time is now!

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: September 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 582
Genre: Historical Fiction
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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Insecto-Cide

Mike Jalland

Five highly innovative and entertaining short stories that will grip and surprise the reader. Big Game hunters thought that the perfect environment had been created for them but were they really committing
INSECTO-CIDE
The World teeters on the brink of disaster, what is the incredible surprising solution?
THE ULTIMATE QUESTION IS ANSWERED
An extraordinary untold tale only recently rediscovered from archives concerning the infamous death camp
ONE CERTAIN NIGHT IN AUSCHWITZ
Was the most famous ancient relic really there? Was the world ready for it’s discovery?
GOD’S PROPERTY
A dark violent story of a parent’s unlikely revenge on an evil murderer in a seemingly safe place, how can the messenger of death possibly reach him?
TRUE JUSTICE
Introductory story to a place within our world where usually successful Hunters become prey – No return ticket required ! This story will hold extra appeal to everyone who dislikes hunting


An Extract from Insecto-Cide

Professor Bernard Rickman hummed a nameless little tune to himself, pleased with the amazing progress that he and his long time friend and colleague since their twin double firsts at Oxbridge days, Professor Alec Blake, had achieved. Alec was a leading, probably the leading molecular biologist (including also palebiology), he himself was one of the very top physicists in the world. In their early forties, they both had extremely well paid posts with huge multinational conglomerates but it was their combined secret private research funded out of their own pockets that was the cause of his, yes he had to admit it, excitement, an emotion rarely felt by his scientific, analytic mind.

Their combined brilliance had steadily made progress from the first discussed extraordinary innovative concept, and step by step their ideas had been proved viable and minitests had indicated eventual success as being viable and indeed realistic. Last night’s endeavours had been successful and now the big test was looming in the immediate future.

Bernard’s cleanshaven face with dark hair brushed back and thoughtful grey eyes mirrored exactly what he was, a distinguished, studious man who didn’t really ever expect to be wrong about anything. He stopped to ponder over matters momentarily, if it worked and it ought to work, the result and ramifications were (he frowned at the term that automatically sprang up) mind-blowing. The knock-on effects would be staggering, the financial possibilities limitless, literally “Write your own figure.” However financial gain was neither man’s priority, far from it although both enjoyed and expected a fine lifestyle in line with their IQs and contributions to science but they were men who had both high moral and ethical standards.

Bernard and Alec had always got on well together, their wives were also good friends and all enjoyed their regular dinner parties as only people who genuinely like each other can do. The two men shared the same views on politics and the realistic conservation of the world’s resources and nonexploitation. Both detested corporate greed and in particular the subject that had decided them on a suitable route for the final test, they hated any cavalier attitude to endangered species along with an abhorrence of hunting in general. They were astounded at how any sane person could get enjoyment from killing an animal and also despised any inference that any skill was required to be perhaps hundreds of yards away from any possible danger, squeezing the trigger of a powerful rifle with some poor animal in the crosshairs of the telescopic sights.

Over several generous brandies after a pleasant restaurant meal with just the two of them one night that very topic, the enormous stacking of the odds in favour of the hunter that, in all likelihood the quarry didn’t even know was stalking it, prompted Bernard to pose the question that had kickstarted the whole endeavour.

“What if the hunted creature was far, far more dangerous? What if it was stronger, better protected, had a far more lethal armoury of weapons, better senses, incredibly aggressive nature, a natural killer? I wonder what those pathetic hunting types would do then, would they even dare to risk going after such a creature?” mused Bernard.

“An interesting hypothesis,” responded Alec, “But what sort of creatures did you have in mind, some sort of mutants?”

Alec’s slightly thinning sandy hair, sometimes a little tousled, implied an academic whose appearance might well come second to inventive thought. The spectacles that he had a habit of often removing and needlessly polishing confirmed that this was a man who likely stood outside of general life, looking in, objectively.

“No not mutants,” replied Bernard, “What I have in mind are naturally already more than dangerous enough, they don’t need any improving.”

“Go on Bernard, I’m intrigued,” replied his friend.

Albert Einstein was arguably the most intelligent person of the twentieth century. It has been stated that when he was discussing science at the very highest level there were only about six people on the planet who could understand what he was talking about. Einstein also once said, “There is nothing more certain than the existence of God.” This was also a belief that the two scientists subscribed to.

Bernard continued, “I wonder if many people have ever considered just how fortunate it was for human beings that most large powerful creatures such as elephants, hippos, rhinos, cows, horses and buffalo to quote just a few, are herbivorous. They are harmless and leave mankind alone unless provoked.

Can you possibly imagine what would have happened to early man if insects were large? Most are extremely aggressive, have terrifying weapons, and are amazingly strong, I understand that the goliath beetle for instance, one of the strongest insects, has the equivalent strength proportionate to a human being able to lift ten elephants, incredible! Some have excellent armour, many can walk up walls, across ceilings, are poisonous and some fly,” waiting a moment for his point to be made he then concluded with his trump card, “and the crunch is that many are carnivorous. They would have slaughtered early man, it would have been no contest, we would have been wiped out.”

There was a moment’s silence as Alex refilled his glass. “I believe you are certainly correct however fortunately for us all they aren’t big so what exactly are you getting at?”
Bernard also refilled his glass and settled himself comfortably in the chair before gazing steadily at his old friend and with only the slightest hint of a smile said: “Well Alec, what if we MADE them big?”

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: August 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 146
Genre: Short Stories
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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The Influence of Piano

Liana Ainge

Why do lawyers want to learn to play the piano? At first sight jurisprudence, with its exhaustive logic, rules and standard tasks, is poles apart from the sensual world of music, but in reality it just seems so. Although this book will be of particular interest to lawyers it also will have a much wider appeal to anyone who is dedicated to learning the piano from beginners to professionals. By reading this book, you will learn how and why training in music develops logical, abstract and creative thinking, and contributes to success in every sphere of human life.


An Extract from The Influence of Piano

I teach lawyers to play the piano. Not only lawyers, but the majority of my adult students are lawyers. Whoever hears about that for the first time is surprised. What a weird thing! Why do lawyers want to learn to play the piano? At first sight jurisprudence, with its exhaustive logic, rules and standard tasks, is poles apart from the sensual world of music, but in reality it just seems so.

Professional musicians possess well developed analytical skills and spatial, abstract and creative thinking. Music is not only feelings. Music is feelings and logic, creativity and planning, unpredictability and all about meeting expectations. When adults who have a stable personality and a wide range of knowledge and habits begin studying music they re-discover themselves, find new aspects of their personality and begin to think and behave in a more effective manner.

While listening to music, the limbic system, which controls emotions and feelings, is activated. When you learn to play a musical instrument, your logic, responsible for information planning, analysis and synthesis, starts operating. When creating music, logic, abstract and creative thinking are activated and emotions and feelings are set in motion. Music develops emotional intellect and protects you from emotional exhaustion. Continually evoking new images and emotions, it forms new neuronal connections and improves the interaction between the cerebral hemispheres.

We use the same movements in everyday life and while working. Our motions are of a repetitive kind on a daily basis. Some muscles work more, others work less and some are out of use. The same activity makes us both act and think in the same way. We get used to thinking in non-random patterns. After all everything that is repeated several times becomes either a thinking pattern or a behavioural one.

Neurobiological studies show that the fabric of the brain of a musician is different from that of a nonmusician. Each of us looks at the world through the eyes of the profession that takes up most of our time. If you look at the world through the eyes of a lawyer, an engineer, a teacher, a biologist, a phsycologist or other profession, you can widen your horizons by trying to see the world through the eyes of a musician. Just start studying music!

We are used to using existing patterns but in order to develop thinking we need to search for new activities and learn them. Learning to play the piano is learning new movements with two hands working at the same time. Non-typical movements form new connections between the brain cells, and that is the reason why we start to move in an atypical way and also why we start to think that way. Music influences us physically, it changes our perception and thinking, and that is the reason that learning to play the piano at an adult age expands the brain, decreases pain and delays the aging process.

Music is my life, my love and my profession. Not everybody can think in this way. After all we are all very different, but I know that music is like sport, it can be for everybody.
Each can engage in music in a different way and with a different purpose, and it is available for everybody. My youngest student to date was four and the oldest was 85. Studying music at any age with any experience develops musical thinking, the primary characteristic of which is flexibility.

Music is an artistic reflection of life, a way of communication, a way of cultural study and selfdevelopment. In this book I will explain how and why children and adults learn music and how it effects health, intellect, studying, work, business and daily routine. I will describe my method of teaching the piano, which takes into consideration students’ fundamental thinking skills. Not everything is about music, and not everything is understood through personal experience, so I explore scientific research and use the data gleaned therefrom while teaching students to play the piano. I would like to share the most important elements of that data with you.

Publisher: Clink Street Publishing
Publication Date: August 2019
Format: Paperback
Pages: 146
Genre: Non-Fiction
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Review Copy
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