Archive for the ‘Fabulou5’ Category

Five Fabulous…Reasons to Read

fab-five-logo-e1397403514389Five Fabulous Books is an original feature here at Big Book Little Book. The aim of the feature is to showcase fabulous books and bookish things, with connecting themes, there by promoting reads we have enjoyed and sharing recommendations for similar books. We love to share contributions from fellow bibliophiles, bloggers, vloggers and twitter users. We love to hear from you too, so don’t forget to comment with your favourite themed books. You are very welcome to use the Five Fabulous feature on your own blog just be sure to link back to Big Book Little Book and leave your link in the comments below so we can check out your recommendations! Feel free to copy and paste our Fabulou5 graphic or create one of your own.

Reasons to read are fairly infinite, any book lover will tell you that! So being one of the latter category I have attempted to narrow it down to….well lets say five :p

To Learn
It’s the main and most commonly acknowledged reason to read. It’s probably a bit of a boring one too but to be honest it’s the truth. There is so much to be learnt and not just from textbooks and autobiographies. Even the most outlandishly impossible fantasies are initially constructed from our reality, and are designed by a mind who’s reality is very much our own so it stands to reason that something of our world will transpire and linger. And even if you don’t feel this is the case emotionally books can make you grow and learn volumes, no pun intended! For instance which of you who has read Pride and Prejudice can say they didn’t learn a thing or two about that point in time in history, and/or appreciated the subtle but strong characters and their speech which delivers strong sentiments shrouded in politeness but cutting nevertheless.

But we don’t have to look that far back in our literature history, Harry Potter has touched the lives of many young and old, and continues to do so. It has given some the courage to come out of their shell, it has brought people together, helped those who struggled to make friends, and it is an emotionally touching story.

To open your mind and stimulate your imagination
I think anyone who has even attempted to read (let alone actually finished it) The Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, Harry Potter,His Dark Materials etc can appreciate that the minds that create these worlds are vastly imaginative and know no bounds. It stands to reason (and again has been scientifically proven) that the more you read the more your mind becomes inquisitive and starts to give shape to what you’re reading, and before you know it you’ll be imagining your own worlds and stories, and if we’re lucky you’ll write them down and share them with us. The mind is a muscle and as such needs exercise including the creative aspect of it. A famous Italian poet once said it is an endeavor to keep our inner child and imagination alive and through it our youth; and what better way to do it than by reading!

To de-stress/relax
Because sometimes there is nothing more relaxing that curling up on a sofa, with a giant mug of tea (yes even in the summer- it could be iced tea!) and disappearing into a good book, someone else’s life, a new adventure, a new world…

And just because I am a proud bookish geek through and through, it has been scientifically proven that us bookworms lead a more stress free life because we have found a healthy way of disconnecting the old noodle for a while and relaxing. It’s better than yoga!!!

Ok so these are the main “serious reasons” that a good normal sensible adult should say. And now for the real bookworm reasons!!!

To Escape
I have to admit there are infinite reasons why people read but this is the main reason I read. I love nothing better than to dive headfirst into a book, a life, a new quest, a new world and escape my own with all it’s troubles. Admittedly eventually I have to resurface (sadly) but escaping to a new place or even an old place that you are revisiting because you loved it so much the first 50 times you read it is one of the best feelings in the world. Time can speed up and slow down as you please, you can choose excitement, horror, romance or comedy or all of them at every turn of a page. You can identify with characters, make them your friends or enemies, change them in your mind, give them new adventures when the book is over if you’re not ready to let go yet. Your options are endless all you need to do is open the first page and tune the world out for a bit.
Best feeling ever.

It’s Fun
For all the afore mentioned reasons reading cannot be described as anything short of fun, exhilarating, exciting and basically AMAZING!!!

Ever tried reading the same book as a friend, starting it at the same time, in the same living room, on the same sofa? Our fearless leader, Caroline, and I have done it several times and it’s soooo much fun! The giggles, the gasps, the blushing and the inevitable shock horror look we gave each other as we both looked up at the same time is priceless and a wonderfully cherished memory. Try it!

I could go on and on and basically write you a whole dissertation on how books teach you so much and reading is an amazing thing, but you’re not reading this post so that I can put you to sleep (there’s another reason to read! Lol) so all I’ll say is that books are genuinely awesome, and if you don’t believe me get a good recommendation, turn the first page, open your mind and read…and then you will see.

Posted by Pruedence

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Five Fabulous Books…Set In Other Countries

fab-five-logo-e1397403514389Five Fabulous Books is an original feature here at Big Book Little Book. The aim of the feature is to showcase fabulous books and bookish things, with connecting themes, there by promoting reads we have enjoyed and sharing recommendations for similar books. We love to share contributions from fellow bibliophiles, bloggers, vloggers and twitter users. We love to hear from you too, so don’t forget to comment with your favourite themed books. You are very welcome to use the Five Fabulous feature on your own blog just be sure to link back to Big Book Little Book and leave your link in the comments below so we can check out your recommendations! Feel free to copy and paste our Fabulou5 graphic or create one of your own.

Fab five reads based in other countries

The Island by Victoria Hislop this is a fascinating novel set on the island of Spinalonga, just off Crete. This is where the lepers are sent to live tugs at the heart strings for those separated from their loved ones. Set in the time around the 2nd World War there is loads of historical interest too.

The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith, one of my favourite easy reads, it has undemanding prose and wonderful characters. The gentle humour and light hearted style make this a go to relaxing read. Set in Botswana the backdrop is delicious with the sun shining and the gorgeous landscape and where the day to day pace if life seems to jog along easily, it’s perfect to relax with. The fact that there are now at least 12 books in the series is an added bonus!

The Far Pavilions by MM Kaye
This us a great epic read, sweeping landscapes, exotic culture, love and heartbreak, a story that spans decades. An Indian back drop is painted beautifully for us and the characters are rich and satisfying. A perfect long read to lose yourself in.

The Light Between Oceans by M L Stedman is another novel with history. This is set after the First World War on a remote lighthouse off Australia. There is a gripping moral dilemma for us to explore, with characters that capture the imagination and who make it really hard to know who to root for. Thus novel transports you to an old, forgotten world.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, OK some of you might think this is a bit if a cheat but set in futuristic America, known now as Panem it is a brilliant foil for all the historical novels! If you haven’t heard if this by now I don’t know what you’ve been doing. I have read this a couple of tines now and still find the subject matter challenging and engaging in equal measure. Easy to read, with lots happening and keeping you on the edge of your seat at times it’s a great modern read.

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Five Fabulous books…Made in to Films

fab-five-logo-e1397403514389Five Fabulous Books is a new feature here at Big Book Little Book. The aim of the feature is to showcase fabulous books with connecting themes, there by promoting reads we have enjoyed and share recommendations for similar books. We hope to share contributions from fellow bibliophiles, bloggers, vloggers and twitter users. We love to hear from you too, so don’t forget to comment with your favourite themed books. If you create your own Fabulous Five posts be sure to link back to Big Book Little Book and leave your link in the comments below so we can check out your recommendations!

Two of my favourite things to do are reading books and watching films. Therefore I get really excited when there are films which were originally books.

My fabulous five favourite books made in to films.

Harry Potter
The sound track to the film is absolutely amazing! It really brings the magic to life. Whenever I hear the music I tingle!

Narnia: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
All of the special effects brought the strory to life just as I imagined it to be.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
The real actors portrayed the characters as they were in my head.

Paddington
The way that they made Paddinfton Bear was amazing! It actually looked like there was a real live bear which made it look fantastic.

The Worst Witch Saves the Day
The film was very true to the book. The bits that were missed out or changed slightly didn’t take away from the story

Post by Avilee (8)

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Party Invite…

fab-five-logo-e1397403514389I’m not quiet sure how the Big Book Little Book Blog birthday manages to creep up on me each year, but lo and behold, I turned a few pages ahead in my diary and there it was “July 15th Big Book Little Book 5th Birthday!!”

Our firth birthday is the perfect opportunity to revitalize the blog, re affirm our connections in the book loving community and re launch our Fabulous Five feature.

Five Fabulous Books is an original Big Book Little Book.
The aim of the feature is to showcase fabulous books with connecting themes, there by promoting reads we have enjoyed and share recommendations for similar books.

We are looking for people who would be willing to write Fabulous Five guest posts for Big Book Little Book to feature during our birthday month.
Links to your own website/ blogs/ twitter and a bio will be included with your post.

For people who prefer to only write content for their own platforms we are inviting people to post their own Fabulous Five posts in July.

Feel free to copy and paste our Fabulou5 graphic or create one of your own. If you create your own Fabulous Five posts all we ask is that you link back to Big Book Little Book.

Make sure that you leave a link to your post in the comments below or in the Fabulous at five linky we will provide, so that we can check out your recommendations and include you in our birthday wrap up post.

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Five Fabulous Books…Which Feature Imaginary Friends

fab five logo Five Fabulous Books is a new feature here at Big Book Little Book. The aim of the feature is to showcase fabulous books with connecting themes, there by promoting reads we have enjoyed and share recommendations for similar books. We hope to share contributions from fellow bibliophiles, bloggers, vloggers and twitter users. We love to hear from you too, so don’t forget to comment with your favourite themed books. If you create your own Fabulous Five posts be sure to link back to Big Book Little Book and leave your link in the comments below so we can check out your recommendations!

Playmate, confident or scapegoat?

The five fabulous books I have selected to showcase this week span the age categories and all feature imaginary friends (or do they?!).

I find the idea of Imaginary friends fascinating. Perhaps it stems from enviously watching my younger brother with his imaginary friend. The tale of his epic meltdown, when my aunty forgot his best friend “Boy”, is legendary within our family. He refused to calm down, or leave the building until he and my aunty had retraced their steps, taking a lift back up to the twelfth floor to collect Boy!

I suppose that my attachment to fictional characters is like having hundreds of imaginary friends within the pages of my beloved books.

dino bath tubThere’s A Dinosaur In My Bathtub by Catalia Echeverri
Only Amelia can see Pierre, because he is very good at hiding. The two have the most amazing summer full of adventures at sea, on the moon and in all kinds of magical lands. But everyone knows that French dinosaurs like Pierre only get to stay in people’s bathtubs for the summer.
This lovely picture book from Bloomsbury showed up on our door stop unexpectedly one morning and has become a firm favourite of both my four and six year old, a rarity recently, resulting in a harmonious shared story time.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s
Publication Date: April 2014
Format: Paperback
Pages: 32
Genre: Dystopian
Age: Picture book
Reviewer: Caroline
Source: Provided by publisher
Challenge:

squishySquishy McFluff by Pip Jones
Can you see him? My kitten? Close your eyes tight
His fur is so soft and all silvery white
Imagine him quick! Have you imagined enough?
Oh, good, you can see him! It’s Squishy McFluff!
When Ava discovers an imaginary cat in the cabbage patch, she knows she’s found a new best friend. Together, Ava and Squishy McFluff get up to all kinds of mischief…

This gorgeous rhyming book has delighted both myself and my six year old daughter. The rhyme, the font and the division of the story in to chapters all led themselves to independent reading however, the cheeky humour is a delight for early and *cough* more mature *cough* readers alike. I defy you to not gobble this up in a single sitting, with or without your own mischievous Ava as a captivated audience.

Publisher: Faber and Faber
Publication Date: February 2014
Format: Paperback
Pages: 80
Genre: Children’s, Humour
Age: Early Reader
Reviewer: Caroline and Ava
Source: Provided by publisher
Challenge: British book

a monster callsA Monster Calls by Patric Ness and Jim Kay
The monster showed up after midnight. As they do.
But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming…
This monster is something different, though. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor.
It wants the truth.

Karen says “Verdict: This is a book, even in it’s Paperback form that will be treasured for it’s outer beauty and for the heart wrenching story within”
Read Karen’s full review here

Publisher: Walker
Publication Date: February 2012
Format: Paperback
Pages: 216
Genre: Fantasy
Age: Middle grade
Reviewer: Karen
Source: Own copy
Challenge: British book

unspokenUnspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan
Kami Glass loves someone she’s never met . . . a boy she’s talked to in her head ever since she was born. She wasn’t silent about her imaginary friend during her childhood, and is thus a bit of an outsider in her sleepy English town of Sorry-in-the-Vale. Still, Kami hasn’t suffered too much from not fitting in. She has a best friend, runs the school newspaper, and is only occasionally caught talking to herself. Her life is in order, just the way she likes it, despite the voice in her head.
But all that changes when the Lynburns return.
The Lynburn family has owned the spectacular and sinister manor that overlooks Sorry-in-the-Vale for centuries. The mysterious twin sisters who abandoned their ancestral home a generation ago are back, along with their teenage sons, Jared and Ash, one of whom is eerily familiar to Kami. Kami is not one to shy away from the unknown—in fact, she’s determined to find answers for all the questions Sorry-in-the-Vale is suddenly posing. Who is responsible for the bloody deeds in the depths of the woods? What is her own mother hiding? And now that her imaginary friend has become a real boy, does she still love him? Does she hate him? Can she trust him?

OMG I absolutely loved this book, but my goodness Sarah Rees Brennan is a cruel, cruel woman who survives on the tears of her readers! Do your self a favour and check it out, but make sure that you have the second book ready to go because you are not going to want to wait to read the second instalment. The wait for the third and final book (September 2014) is going to be excruciating.

Publisher: Random House
Publication Date: September 2012
Format: Hardback
Pages: 272
Genre: Fantasy
Age: YA
Reviewer: Caroline
Source: Own copy
Challenge: British book

if you could see meIf You Could See Me Now by Cecelia Ahern
Readers and critics alike adore Cecelia Ahern for her lighthearted yet insightful stories about modern women and their often unusual situations. In If You Could See Me Now, she takes that theme a step further, offering us a heroine who is entirely believable, and the new man in her life who is, well, slightly less so.
Elizabeth Egan’s life runs on order: Both her home and her emotions are arranged just so, with little room for spontaneity. It’s how she counteracts the chaos of her family — an alcoholic mother who left when she was young, an emotionally distant father, and a free-spirited sister, who seems to be following in their mother’s footsteps, leaving her own six-yearold son, Luke, in Elizabeth’s care. When Ivan, Luke’s mysterious new grown-up friend, enters the picture, Elizabeth doesn’t know quite what to make of him. With his penchant for adventure and colorful take on things large and small, Ivan opens Elizabeth’s eyes to a whole new way of living. But is it for real? Is Ivan for real?
If You Could See Me Now is a love story with heart — and just a touch of magic.

I have to admit that I felt a touch apprehensive at reading what was my first adult novel for some time, not to mention that it is a favourite of a good friend of mine. My apprehension was all for nothing. I loved the combination of contemporary setting, magical realism, laugh out loud moments and poignant, touching scenes. A lovely, lovely read. I will definitely be checking out some more of Ahern’s work in the future.

Publisher:
Publication Date: November 2005
Format: Paperback
Pages: 410
Genre: Fantasy
Age: Adult
Reviewer: Caroline
Source: Borrowed
Challenge:

Honourable Mentions:
Jack’s Amazing Shadow by Tom Percival and Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks.

Twitter Recommends:
A Dog So Small by Philippa Pearce (@dark_Fell), Dr. Bird’s Advice For Sad Poets by Evan Roskos(@musingteacher), Who Framed Klaris cliff by Nikki Sheehan (@daydreamin_star)and The Perks Of Being A Wall Flower by Stephen Chbosky(@barbaralib0202).

Did you have an imaginary friend?
Are you as protective of your fictional friends as I am?
What are your favourite reads featuring imaginary friends?

Posted by Caroline

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