Posts Tagged ‘Clive Eaton’

Self Published Sunday: The Pyramid Legacy

Two weeks a go we were delighted to interview Clive Eaton about his reading and writing experiences.
Clive has kindly returned to Self Published Sunday to share an excerpt from his debut novel The Pyramid Legacy.

For over four millennia the Great Pyramid of Giza has guarded a secret image; until NOW!
A prominent young Egyptologist is murdered by a colleague, deep within the bowels of the Great Pyramid of Giza. The authorities are keen to cover it up, but they know they can’t achieve total closure whilst English robotics engineer, Ben Anderson, remains in possession of a powerful image. An image, which suggests the Great Pyramid at Giza was not built by ancient Egyptians.
What the Egyptian authorities don’t know is that unless the true meaning behind the image can be established, along with other images which will later surface, the future of mankind will face the most serious threat imaginable. Anderson manages to escape Egypt at the earliest opportunity, together with his astrophysicist girlfriend, Samantha Gibson, but the authorities are quickly on their tail when it becomes evident they have arrested the wrong person. Keen to establish who really built the Pyramids, Anderson seeks to gain additional proof to support his theory.
As he and Gibson begin to discover a series of seemingly disparate clues, they soon realise that everything is far from straightforward. Whilst seeking additional resources, Gibson is unwittingly embroiled in the internal politics of the US military, with the result that she becomes a pawn in a vicious power struggle involving a corrupt senior officer. Her path crosses that of an ex-lover and her relationship with Anderson stretches to breaking point. As Anderson begins to see Gibson from a totally different perspective, his focus changes, and he pushes himself well beyond the limits of his comfort zone in an attempt to discover the truth. Gibson is now prepared to do anything to fulfil a lifetime ambition, but as her objective becomes almost within her grasp a virulent virus threatens to stop her . . . and Anderson has the antidote . . . together with a totally different agenda. And so an unprecedented race begins to finally reveal the true legacy of the Great Pyramid of Giza.
The Pyramid Legacy is a thriller, but also has a story of love and deceit deeply woven in

Then God said, ‘Let us make man in our image, according to our likeness . . .’ Genesis 1:2

Prologue

Northeast Africa, 2350BC
They stood in an excited group, evaluating the task they had almost completed. Seven of them, no more, no less, gathered among the last rays of the sun. Silence descended upon the celebration when the leader raised his hand and wrapped a withered arm around his youngest prodigy. His eyes sparkled with warmth.

‘It has been decided that you will be given the honour of positioning the final component,’ he declared, squeezing the young man’s shoulders with pride.

A broad smile swept across the youth’s face as his colleagues cheered.

The sunset painted their creation and its surrounding landscape with a warm orange glow. The leader lifted the corner of a large cloth, allowing the low sunlight to give life to a brightly coloured object trapped beneath. He studied the young man’s expression and read warm respect reflected in his prodigy’s eyes.

‘Carry out this task with the utmost care,’ advised the sage, patting the youth’s shoulder with a paternal touch. A glimmer of a smile and the slightest of nods gave the leader the response he sought.

Twenty minutes later the task was complete. All the equipment was cross-checked against the master inventory and securely packed away.

The leader faced his team and regarded each of them in turn, appreciating the pride in every familiar face. ‘You have all done outstanding work and deserve to be congratulated on your achievement.’
He gazed towards the heavens, watching as dusk drifted into nightfall. The last flicker of sunlight quietly retired beyond the horizon.

He returned his attention to his team and held out his arms, indicating what they had done. ‘Enjoy our creation for one final moment,’ he advised. ‘We may not return for some time.’

They stared, mesmerized until a blinding light shot suddenly from above, encapsulating the entire team. They each held up a hand to protect their eyes. Then they were gone.

Chapter 1

Cairo, 2025AD
A voice rose over the hum of a mobile air-conditioning unit, bright with excitement. ‘Khalfani! Mohammed! Come and see what we’ve found.’

The two men peered over their companion’s shoulder, their attention on his monitor. The trestle table on which it sat was in a small anti-chamber, deep within the bowels of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Images blinked on the screen, emanating from a camera which had reached a previously inaccessible chamber and now revealed mysteries unseen by anyone in centuries.
Khalfani Rashid squinted, studying the screen. ‘It’s some form of engraving. What do you think it symbolises?’
‘I’ve no idea,’ replied Sa’eed, his voice still carrying the excitement of his discovery. ‘I’ll do some searches on the computer to see if I can establish exactly what it is. Give me a few minutes.’
Rashid glanced towards Mohammed Acbel. ‘Any ideas?’

Acbel shook his head and continued to stare at the screen. ‘Let’s sit down over there and leave Sa’eed to carry out his search.’
In less than ten minutes Sa’eed called to his colleagues, announcing he had a match. ‘Although the engraving in the chamber is actually the mirror image of what I have here, I can now tell you exactly what we are seeing.’ Sa’eed turned towards the other two, his face drawn with concern. ‘And believe me, you’re not going to like it.’

Rashid scrambled to his feet and made his way to where Sa’eed, perched on an upturned crate, operated both the computer and the remote camera. He glanced over Sa’eed’s shoulder, reading the description on the screen. It took a few moments before he realised the significance of what he was seeing. Then he paled and clung to the side of the table for support, mentally comparing the images he had just seen to what technology he knew had been available to his ancestors.

‘No, no, no,’ he muttered. ‘This is impossible. This can’t be right. There must be a—’ The ground beneath his feet seemed to lurch in that moment. Rashid’s legs buckled and he collapsed onto the floor.

‘Khalfani? Khalfani! What’s wrong with you?’ Acbel tugged at his colleague’s limp body, shifting him into a seated position and tucking his head between his legs. Within seconds, he showed signs of life. ‘Khalfani!’ Acbel repeated. ‘What’s the matter with you?’
Rashid, still disorientated, glanced up and blinked at the other man. ‘Look at the computer. Read the description.’ He shook his head slowly. ‘Please tell me I’m seeing things. It can’t be true. It’s not possible.’

Acbel examined the computer screen and suddenly made the same connection as had his colleague. He shook his head like a dog and placed a hand on the wall of the pyramid to steady himself.

‘It can’t be.’ He refocused on the screen and spun to study the other monitor, comparing the two. ‘How did that get there?’ he managed.

Rashid struggled back onto his feet. ‘More importantly, who did it? It couldn’t have been our predecessors.’ Groaning, he pressed his hands against the sides of his head. ‘This is catastrophic news. Do you realise this discovery puts a huge question mark over the entire origin of this pyramid? This could destroy everything we’ve ever known.’

Sa’eed and Acbel nodded, their expressions anxious. All three scrutinised the images on the screens for several minutes.
Sa’eed finally stood, breaking the silence. ‘Ben should be here by now. I’ll go get him and show him what we’ve found. He might know something we don’t.’

Rashid grabbed Sa’eed’s arm, eyes wide. ‘No! Anderson mustn’t see this under any circumstances. Nobody can see this.’
Sa’eed yanked his arm away, confused by Rashid’s behaviour. ‘Don’t be ridiculous. He’s part of this team. Without his robot we would never have made this discovery. He deserves to know what we’ve found.’

Rashid glanced at his watch. Sa’eed was right; Ben Anderson would be waiting for them outside the pyramid. Rashid shook his head, feeling his hands grow clammy with sweat. He couldn’t allow Sa’eed to share their find with anyone, least of all Anderson. If any of this got into the public eye, he, and everything he had ever worked for, would be ruined. He gripped Sa’eed’s arm tighter.
‘Sa’eed. Listen to me. You know as well as anyone that what we have discovered today has to remain secret from the outside world. Think of the consequences if it becomes public knowledge. The very foundation of our country’s proud history would crumble beneath our feet. It would affect the economy, and—’

Sa’eed pulled away his arm and shook his head. ‘You’re wrong. So wrong. I won’t be part of a cover up. I see it as my duty to present my findings in an accurate manner. If we can understand what the image symbolises, we can—’

‘Your findings?’ roared Rashid. ‘This is my project. Mine! And it would serve you well to remember that.’

‘Again, you’re totally wrong.’ Sa’eed swept his arm around the anti-chamber. ‘This doesn’t belong to you. This represents the history of our country, whatever that history may turn out to be. None of us owns the pyramids, but we can all learn from them. I, for one, want to understand why something which is clearly not the work of our forefathers has been engraved on the ceiling of a chamber. Especially here within this, the greatest of all the pyramids. Think about it! This is a four thousand year old mystery waiting to be solved.’ Sa’eed glared into Rashid’s eyes, daring him to disagree. ‘And I want to solve it. So if you’ll please excuse me, I’m going to get Ben.’

Sa’eed turned his back on the other two and headed for the exit.

Rashid stood paralysed for a moment, a sense of desperation sweeping through him. All he could think was that Sa’eed must be stopped. Immediately. He glanced at the toolkit lying on the ground next to the other equipment and picked up a lump-hammer.

Clive Eaton initially trained as an aircraft engineer in the Royal Air Force and worked on Vulcan bombers for a number of years.
He now works as a freelance international trainer in the area of business improvement, and his work has taken him to over 30 countries around the globe.
The Pyramid Legacy is his debut novel and the inspiration came when Egyptian authorities discovered a secret door inside the Great Pyramid of Giza. Although nothing was actually found on that occasion it triggered a ‘what if?’ question, and from there the story developed. Clive is now writing the sequel, which will be titled “Operation Stonehenge”.
The Pyramid Legacy was initially published as an e-book, but now is available as a paperback.
Clive lives in a very peaceful setting, with his wife Judy, in the heart of rural Norfolk, England, which he believes is an amazing place for getting in the right mood for writing.
To learn more about Clive and his debut novel The Pyramid Legacy follow him on Facebook or Twitter.

The Pyramid Legacy is available to buy in paper and ebook formats from Amazon.com, Amazon UK, Smashwords and iTunes for books.

Posted on:

Self Published Sunday: Clive Eaton

Please give a warm welcome to debut novelist Clive Eaton.

Clive Eaton initially trained as an aircraft engineer in the Royal Air Force and worked on Vulcan bombers for a number of years.
He now works as a freelance international trainer in the area of business improvement, and his work has taken him to over 30 countries around the globe.
The Pyramid Legacy is his debut novel and the inspiration came when Egyptian authorities discovered a secret door inside the Great Pyramid of Giza. Although nothing was actually found on that occasion it triggered a ‘what if?’ question, and from there the story developed. Clive is now writing the sequel, which will be titled “Operation Stonehenge”.
The Pyramid Legacy was initially published as an e-book, but now is available as a paperback.
Clive lives in a very peaceful setting, with his wife Judy, in the heart of rural Norfolk, England, which he believes is an amazing place for getting in the right mood for writing.

What do you do when you are not writing?
I’m a freelance business management trainer and have delivered training programmes in over 30 countries across the globe.

What inspired you to become a writer?
I spend a lot of time writing training material, which at times is quite tedious. With all the travelling, and staying in hotels, I wanted to use my time productively, and writing novels, which I get an immense buzz from, started from there.

What was your inspiration for The Pyramid Legacy?
When I was a child I watched a movie (in black and white) which featured the Great Pyramid of Giza. I don’t remember the title of the film, but the images have stayed with me for years. Then, several years ago an attempt was made to see behind a secret door inside Khufu’s pyramid; without success. My mind started to race with ideas of what may lie behind the door – and so ‘The Pyramid Legacy’ was born.

Tell us about your book?
It is set in the near future, and the lead character, Ben Anderson, is a robotics engineer. He’s developed a machine with the capability of peering behind the secret door. What is found is a staggering image that results in murder, and a race to find other pieces of a complex puzzle. The image, which the Great Pyramid of Giza has been protecting for 4,000 years, places a big question mark over who the built the Pyramids in the first place.

What research did you do for The Pyramid Legacy?
I spent hours and hours researching all the different aspects within the book, including a field trip to the Pyramids themselves. Along the way I found more and more aspects linking some of the great monuments of the era, when the Pyramids were allegedly built, which resulted in a plot for the sequel.

Are any elements of your book based on real life experiences/people?
The characters are a composite of many people I have met in my life (e.g. I spent 7 years in the British Forces as an aircraft engineer) and I’ve given the lead character one of my personal phobias – but you’ll have to read the book to find out what it is.

If The Pyramid Legacy was made in to a film which actor(s), past or present, do you envision in the lead role(s)?
My wife, who is a consultant clinical psychologist, and fully understands where I’m coming from with my characters, has a very clear idea of who should play the lead role – Ewan McGregor. I’m inclined to agree.

If your book had a soundtrack which artists would feature on it?
My favourite band is The Who, and Pete Townshend has written some amazing stuff. In 1972 he wrote a song called ‘Relay’ where he envisaged a system for ‘spreading the word’. I guess today that system is the Internet. A sound track penned by a forward thinker like Pete Townshend would be awesome.
What are you currently working on?
I’m currently writing the sequel to The Pyramid Legacy, which is titled Operation Stonehenge. The story developed from discovering a very clear link between the Pyramids and Stonehenge.

What is your writing process?
Once I have a concept for a plot in my head I write a detailed outline. Then I give the key characters 5 or 6 specific characteristics. I try to visualise the story like a film. This helps in both character development and building on the different aspects of the plot. Everything goes straight into a word processor, although I do use the ‘memo’ function within my mobile phone to jot down ideas which occur to me whilst I’m on the move.

Do you use anything to sustain you during the writing process? Coffee? Chocolate? Music?
I like to write in silence, without outside interruptions. Living in rural Norfolk helps a lot. Frequent visits to the kitchen to grab a coffee is also part of the process.

What prompted you to self publish The Pyramid Legacy?
Apart from the ‘Dear John’ letters sent out by agents, I found out from my editor that it can take between 18 months and two years to get a book to print. With the Internet offering e-books I believe the industry is going to go through some massive changes. I didn’t want my work sitting on a hard drive waiting endlessly for agents just to dismiss it out of hand. So I took the plunge and self-published, but only after a thorough and professional edit.

Can you tell us about the challenges in writing and publishing your first novel?
The writing was the easy bit, apart from the painstaking editing etc. Publishing is the hard bit. It has been an enormous learning curve, and I still feel I’m probably on the lower slopes. But I feel I’m a fast learner.

Do you ever experience writers block? How do you overcome it?
Sometimes I get the odd block, but it is more about how to best execute a specific scene/chapter. The story is clear in my head, but the detail can sometimes cause the odd barrier. A break and change of scenery for a short while often overcomes the problem.

Do you have any advice for aspiring writers?
Believe in yourself, and don’t take rejection from agents as an indication your work isn’t up to scratch. It is a VERY subjective industry. How many agents must be kicking themselves for passing on the likes of JK Rowling, to name just one very successful author?

Why did you choose to write adult fiction?
I felt the best way to approach writing was to write something that I would like to read. If I don’t like it why would others want to read it? So that left adult fiction as the only option.

How did you choose the genre you write in? What inspired you to write it?
I’ve always tended to gravitate towards books which fall under three broad headings; suspense, thriller and mystery. So I embarked upon the task of trying to cover all three. Many reviewers of the book mention sci-fi, but my intention isn’t to enter the sci-fi market. However, to deliver certain aspects of the story I needed to take a small step into the near future.

How did you get interested in your chosen genre?
I’ve always enjoyed books which are littered with suspense and action, that take twists and turns, and at times make the reader think. The Pyramid Legacy covers a number of topics which can easily be the subject of great debate. My own philosophy is to always keep an open mind and never dismiss any idea, no matter how bizarre it could seem. I wonder if the likes of Henry VIII ever considered man landing on the Moon?

What books have inspired you?
The list is endless, but in recent years I’ve enjoyed reading books by Michael Cordy, Raymond Khoury, Sam Bourne, and the late Paul Sussman. I also read a lot of non-fiction, such as books by Robert Bauval.

What was your favourite book as a child/teenager?
As a child the ‘Biggles’ series by Captain W.E. Johns. Total escapism for a young lad.

What are you currently reading? Raymond Khoury’s ‘The Templar Salvation’.

What was the last book you recommended to a friend?
‘The Colour of Blood’, by Michael Cordy. I’ve read all his books and not one has disappointed me. Come on Michael, where is your next one?

What/Who inspired you as a reader?
The aforementioned Captain W.E. Johns.

Just for fun…
Paper, Audio or eBook?

I’m still ‘old school’ and love the feel of book in my hands.

Tea or Coffee?
Coffee first thing, tea in the afternoon. When arriving back from an overseas trip it has to be a cup of tea.

Slippers or barefoot?
Barefoot

Shower or Bath?
Shower

Marmite: Love it? Hate it?
Yuk! Enough said?

Email or postcard?
Do postcards still exist?

For over four millennia the Great Pyramid of Giza has guarded a secret image; until NOW!
A prominent young Egyptologist is murdered by a colleague, deep within the bowels of the Great Pyramid of Giza. The authorities are keen to cover it up, but they know they can’t achieve total closure whilst English robotics engineer, Ben Anderson, remains in possession of a powerful image. An image, which suggests the Great Pyramid at Giza was not built by ancient Egyptians.
What the Egyptian authorities don’t know is that unless the true meaning behind the image can be established, along with other images which will later surface, the future of mankind will face the most serious threat imaginable. Anderson manages to escape Egypt at the earliest opportunity, together with his astrophysicist girlfriend, Samantha Gibson, but the authorities are quickly on their tail when it becomes evident they have arrested the wrong person. Keen to establish who really built the Pyramids, Anderson seeks to gain additional proof to support his theory.
As he and Gibson begin to discover a series of seemingly disparate clues, they soon realise that everything is far from straightforward. Whilst seeking additional resources, Gibson is unwittingly embroiled in the internal politics of the US military, with the result that she becomes a pawn in a vicious power struggle involving a corrupt senior officer. Her path crosses that of an ex-lover and her relationship with Anderson stretches to breaking point. As Anderson begins to see Gibson from a totally different perspective, his focus changes, and he pushes himself well beyond the limits of his comfort zone in an attempt to discover the truth. Gibson is now prepared to do anything to fulfil a lifetime ambition, but as her objective becomes almost within her grasp a virulent virus threatens to stop her . . . and Anderson has the antidote . . . together with a totally different agenda. And so an unprecedented race begins to finally reveal the true legacy of the Great Pyramid of Giza.
The Pyramid Legacy is a thriller, but also has a story of love and deceit deeply woven in

To learn more about Clive and his debut novel The Pyramid Legacy follow him on Facebook or Twitter.

The Pyramid Legacy is available to buy in paper and ebook formats from Amazon.com, Amazon UK, Smashwords and iTunes for books.

Posted on: