Posts Tagged ‘Publisher-Harper Collins’

Author Interview: Olaf Falafel

We are delighted to welcome Olaf Falafel as he talks about the inspiration behind his book Old MacDonald Heard a Parp
“Old Macdonald heard a parp…E-I-E-I-O!”
There are some VERY rude noises coming from Old Macdonald’s farm – who could be responsible?! Sing along to this side-splitting picture book adaptation of everyone’s favourite nursery rhyme.
Old Macdonald’s busy day on the farm keeps getting interrupted by some VERY rude noises … but who could they be coming from?! A hilarious and irreverent take on the classic nursery song from debut author/illustrator, Olaf Falafel, with helpful do-it-yourself instructions so you can parp along to your heart’s content!

What inspired you to write a children’s book?

The idea for Old MacDonald heard a Parp came to me when I was trying to coming up with ideas for child friendly stand up (I quite often gig for Comedy Club 4 Kids). I started singing it to my kids on the way to school and we did all the different noises, before long it had spread round the playground. When the dinner ladies started telling the kids off for singing it I knew it had potential.

You had a pretty whirlwind experience when it came to getting published – how did it all happen and what was the most surreal moment looking back?

Basically, I’m an illustrator during the day and a comedian in the evenings. I had some spare time due to an illustration job falling through at the last minute so I saw it as the ideal opportunity to draw some of Old MacDonald.

I drew a front cover and the first three or four pages of the book and then it got to the point where I started thinking about what I was going to do with the book when it was finished.

This was when I put out the tweet asking if any publishers were interested along with the drawings that I’d already done to give an idea of what the book would look like. Then twitter went a bit crazy for 24 hours, there were loads of great people who retweeted the idea, loads who private messaged me contacts in the publishing world and loads who wrote lovely comments saying they’d buy the book if it ever got made.

I had eight different agents contact me asking to meet up and I ended up getting direct interest from several publishers, including Harper Collins.

Within four days, I had a literary agent (the wonderful Jo Unwin) and a deal with Harper Collins to produce Old MacDonald plus two follow up books. The whole thing felt surreal.

Which books do you remember most fondly from your own childhood?
I read a lot of comics as a child, I really liked The Beano, most of the characters were naughty kids which appealed to me. I later graduated onto Viz comic which isn’t at all child friendly but it must have had an influence on me as Old MacDonald Heard A Fart was describe as ‘Viz for toddlers’ by one of the first standups who saw it.

Who is your favourite literary character and why?
I’ve always had a soft spot for Winnie The Pooh – it sounds completely out of character for me but that tubby bear made a lot of sense.

How important do you think comedy is for children, and can you ever be too young for a good joke?
For me it’s the other way around – children are important for comedy. My two are a constant source of inspiration for funny thoughts that I have turned into stand up comedy. A lot of the stuff they come out with doesn’t make a lot of sense but can be ridiculously funny.

I understand that you do stand-up for children – how do they differ as an audience from adults?
They have no ‘socially acceptable behaviour filter’ so they quite often say whatever they are thinking whenever they feel like saying it. In a lot of ways, performing to kids is a lot like performing to drunk adults (including the likelihood of being vomited on)

What does the future have in store for Old MacDonald and his parping menagerie?

I’m currently working on the second book, Father Christmas Heard A Parp, which is going to be even better than the first book with some great new characters, new ways of making parp noises plus a great new twist at the end. I’ve also got an idea for the third instalment of the ‘parp trilogy’ currently percolating through my brain – fun farty times ahead!

Picture book sensation and stand-up comedian Olaf Falafel burst onto the scene in 2017 when he posted a call-out to publish his his hilarious debut, Old Macdonald Heard a Parp, on Twitter.
Olaf lives and works in London with his wife and two children, who are his biggest fans.

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Divergent

Veronica Roth

DIVERGENT_B_Format_UK.inddSociety is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue, in the attempt to form a ‘perfect society’. On her Choosing Day, Beatrice Prior renames herself Tris, rejects her family’s Abnegation group, and chooses another faction.

Beatrice Prior lives in a dystopian future world, in a city surrounded by The Fence, keeping everyone safe from whatever lies behind. Her world is divided into 5 groups or ‘Factions’ based on desirable traits and created as a consequence of the war that got them landed behind The Fence. People who blamed the war on selfishness joined Abnegation, those who blamed the war on dishonesty joined Candor, and those who blamed the war on weakness joined the ‘warrior’ Faction, Dauntless. Stupidity, Erudite and aggressiveness, Amity.

The Factions do not mix and live very different lives. Beatrice lives in Abnegation she has been born into that Faction and has always seen herself as a misfit for the faction, their ability to totally forget themselves and their needs and to always help someone in need. Even small things like looking in the mirror are named vain and therefore selfish. Beatrice’s brother Caleb has got it down to a tee. He always helps the elderly person across the street and feeds the Factionless (those who have nowhere to go or have been kicked out of their faction). He belongs in Abnegation whereas Beatrice thinks she doesn’t.

As Caleb and Beatrice are both 16 they have to come up to their Choosing Ceremony where they pick whether to leave their Faction to join another or stay. Beatrice doesn’t know whether she wants to stay with her family or go.

Her Mum and Dad are both important members of the Abnegation society. Because they put their needs before their own, Abnegation are trusted to run the Government. Beatrice’s Dad works alongside Marcus who is getting a lot of questions thrown at him about the soundness of Abnegation’s teachings because Marcus’ son transferred to Dauntless the Warrior Faction 2 years ago and they are blaming Marcus for beating him.

Beatrice has to take an Aptitude test to see which Faction she has the best qualities for. She does the test and finds out she has an Aptitude for Abnegation…and Dauntless and Erudite. Having an affinity for more than one Faction is dangerous and means that you are hard to keep under control. “They call it Divergent”. You can’t tell your family, friends or anyone. You’re in a lot of trouble and have to try and pick the right Faction with no help whatsoever from the Aptitude Test. Beatrice surprises everyone with her choice…

A new name, new friends and a new life but with extra enemies and an elusive instructor who is mysterious and scary but also protective.

Please excuse me while I hyperventilate.

Okay, that over let’s proceed to the book. It is very good. If you get the chance to read it, it is strongly recommended.

Verdict: Teen Fiction! Woo! It’s a really brilliant book and will get you really excited. Fast-paced and thrilling. Not suitable for under 12s.

Reviewed by Daisy (13)

Publisher: Harper Collins
Publication Date: February 2012
Format: Paperback
Pages: 489
Genre: Dystopian
Age: YA
Reviewer: Daisy
Source: Own copy
Challenge: None
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Four; A Divergent Story Collection

Veronica Roth
fourTwo years before Beatrice Prior made her choice, the sixteen-year-old son of Abnegation’s faction leader did the same. Tobias’s transfer to Dauntless is a chance to begin again. Here, he will not be called the name his parents gave him. Here, he will not let fear turn him into a cowering child.
Newly christened “Four,” he discovers during initiation that he will succeed in Dauntless. Initiation is only the beginning, though; Four must claim his place in the Dauntless hierarchy. His decisions will affect future initiates as well as uncover secrets that could threaten his own future—and the future of the entire faction system.
Two years later, Four is poised to take action, but the course is still unclear. The first new initiate who jumps into the net might change all that. With her, the way to righting their world might become clear. With her, it might become possible to be Tobias once again.

What were your overall thoughts on the book?
When I heard about this book, I was sure it was just going to be another way for the publishing house to get money and so I was wary of reading it in case it didn’t add anything to the story. I also assumed the book was Four’s perspective on certain scenes that occur in Divergent but that is not correct. Instead Four tells the story of this character’s history. It is how he became Four and what lead him to the start of Divergent and I have to admit, I really enjoyed it!

What was your favourite aspect of the book?
Quite simply, the writing style. The way Veronica Roth writes is one of the reasons I fell so in love with Divergent. She has a style that pulls you in and makes you just feel all the emotions under the sun. Her style is easy to read while also being descriptive and full of depth. I loved being taken into her world again and it was fabulous seeing it from Four’s perspective as well! Which, you know, is another great aspect of this story!

Who was your favourite character and why?
I feel that the fact this book was about Four, this should be an easy question to answer but instead I’m a little torn. I loved getting to know Four better but I also felt many different wonderful emotions upon other characters creeping up, like Tori, Amar, Zeke, Uriah, and -ofcourse- Tris. But I think I’ll probably stick with Four because, well, he’s Four. And if you don’t know him, read the Divergent series now!

Would you recommend this book?
Yes and No. If you’ve read Divergent and really liked Four then yes, you will love this book. However, if you didn’t like Four then no, stay away from this book (but I’m sure you’ve worked that out for yourself!). If, on the other hand, you haven’t even read Divergent yet, then don’t read this book yet. Only read it once you have read and loved the first book in the series! This book maybe a prequel but it definitely needs to be read after the series. Or at the very least, after the first book.

Summarize in one sentence. (Verdict)
This book is the perfect way to dive back into the world of Divergent, Veronica Roth’s writing, and to be reminded of why Four is just such an incredible character that you wish was alive and with you right now.

Publisher: Harper Collins
Publication Date: July 2014
Format: Paperback
Pages: 208
Genre: Dystopian
Age: YA
Reviewer: Faye
Source: Borrowed
Challenge: None
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A Medal for Leroy.

Michael Morpurgo

leroyWhen Michael’s aunt passes away, she leaves behind a letter that will change everything.
It starts with Michael’s grandfather Leroy, a black officer in WWI who charged into a battle zone not once but three times to save wounded men. His fellow soldiers insisted he deserved special commendations for his bravery but because of the racial barriers, he would go unacknowledged. Now it’s up to Michael to change that.
Inspired by the true story of Walter Tull, the first black officer in the British army, award-winning author Michael Morpurgo delivers a richly layered and memorable story of identity, history, and family

I really like this book! A medal for Leroy is about a boy who visits his auntie’s house regularly but does not enjoy his time there. But he does like seeing their Jack Russell Terrier; Jasper. One day his Auntie snowdrop becomes very ill and gives Michael (the boy) some useful information to unlock all the secrets of his past.

It is a very lovely book. One of the best I’ve read in a while (and I’ve read some good books). It always keeps you wanting to read on and has a very good ending

I would recommend it to all my classmates. After reading Tom’s Sausage Lion (see my review here) I have developed a slight addiction for Morpurgo now and have read my third Michael Morpurgo book in a row! I did try reading Books by Michael Morpurgo when I was younger but couldn’t really get into them. Now I’m a bit older I can’t get enough of them!

Verdict: this is a brilliant book I really love it! and I think it’s aimed for kids 9 and up!

Reviewed by Izzy (10)

Publisher: Harper Collins Children’s
Publication Date: September 2012
Format: Paperback
Pages: 256
Genre: Historical fiction
Age: Middle grade
Reviewer: Izzy (10)
Source: Borrowed
Challenge: British book
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Finish It February: Week Two Roundup

FinishItFeb1

Personal Target: Finish/get up to date with four series

Books read this week: One

Total books read: Two

Series completed for challenge: One

Currently reading: The Bitter Kingdom by Rae Carson (The Girl Of Fire and Thorns #3)

General feedback:
I have had a really busy week, a combination of house improvements and an assessment at work to study for, so I have not managed to read as much as I had hoped.

I am keeping my fingers crosses for a quieter and more productive (reading) week.

In her sign up post Julianna shares the reasons why she has so many unfinished series.

Into The Still Blue by Veronica Rossi

In to the still blueTheir love and their leadership have been tested. Now it’s time for Perry and Aria to unite the Dwellers and the Outsiders in one last desperate attempt to bring balance to their world.
The race to the Still Blue has reached a stalemate. Aria and Perry are determined to find this last safe-haven from the Aether storms before Sable and Hess do-and they are just as determined to stay together.
Meanwhile, time is running out to rescue Cinder, who was abducted by Hess and Sable for his unique abilities. And when Roar returns to camp, he is so furious with Perry that he won’t even look at him, and Perry begins to feel like they have already lost.
Out of options, Perry and Aria assemble a team to mount an impossible rescue mission-because Cinder isn’t just the key to unlocking the Still Blue and their only hope for survival, he’s also their friend. And in a dying world, the bonds between people are what matter most.
In this final book in her stunning Under the Never Sky trilogy, Veronica Rossi raises the stakes to their absolute limit and brings her epic love story to an unforgettable close.

One of the best things about reading a series late is that you get to avoid all of the angst associated with waiting for the next instalment. The very next day after finishing Through the Ever Night, I dove straight back in to Aria and Perry’s world.

The Third and final instalment of the Under The Never Sky Trilogy was everything that I had hoped it would be. It managed to maintain the energy and pace of the earlier books and develop the story further, while still remaining true to the characters we have grown to love.

I particularly enjoyed the interactions between the “Savages” and “Dwellers” which not only highlighted how far our our protagonists had been changed by their experiences since Under The Never Sky, but also showed them utilising their experiences (particularly those from Through The Ever Night), to aid the unity of their group.

Verdict: An excellent end to a fantastic series!

Publisher: Harper Collins
Publication Date: January 2014
Format: Hardback
Pages: 400
Genre: Dystopian, romance
Age: YA
Reviewer: Caroline
Source: Own copy
Challenge: Finish It Feb

To learn more about Finish It Friday and to join in visit our link up post here. To follow the challenge on Twitter search for #Finishitfeb

Posted by Caroline

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Finish It February: Week One Roundup

FinishItFeb1 Finish It February is a month long event where we try to finish as many of our half read books and incomplete series as possible.

Personal Target: Finish/get up to date with four series

Books read this week: One

Total books read: One

Series completed for challenge: None

Currently reading: Into The Still Blue by Veronica Rossi

General feedback:
This week got off to a bit of a slow start, ironically, because I had to finish a review book before I could focus on the challenge. Now that I have gotten into the challenge and finished my first book, I am really excited to make my way through as many of my neglected novels ( visit here to see the full list) possible.
I am also a little hyper because this is the first challenge I have helped to organise ( please excuse the Re-Tweet over load!). It has been fantastic to see other book lovers responding to the challenge and attempting to wrestle their TBR’s in to submission.I am delighted that fellow Bookish Brit Michelle has decided to join us. In her introductory post (here), not only does she share her reasons for joining the challenge, she has also filmed her entire unfinished series TBR!
Faye has done so well this week that she has had to create new targets for the challenge. Read her update (here) and let her know what you think of her cheating ways!

Don’t forget that you can learn more about Finish It Friday including how to join the challenge at the challenge sign up post here. To follow the challenge and join in the fun on Twitter search for #Finishitfeb

Through The Ever Night by Veronica Rossi
It’s been months since Aria learned of her mother’s death.

Through the evernightMonths since Perry became Blood Lord of the Tides, and months since Aria last saw him.
Now Aria and Perry are about to be reunited. It’s a moment they’ve been longing for with countless expectations. And it’s a moment that lives up to all of them. At least, at first.
Then it slips away. The Tides don’t take kindly to former Dwellers like Aria. And the tribe is swirling out of Perry’s control. With the Aether storms worsening every day, the only remaining hope for peace and safety is the Still Blue. But does this haven truly exist?
Threatened by false friends and powerful temptations, Aria and Perry wonder, Can their love survive through the ever night?
In this second book in her spellbinding Under the Never Sky trilogy, Veronica Rossi combines fantasy and sci-fi elements to create a captivating adventure-and a love story as perilous as it is unforgettable.

WHY DID I WAIT SO LONG TO READ THIS BOOK? WHY?
I honestly don’t know why it took me so long to read this amazing sequel to Under The Never Sky (read my review here). Under The Never Sky was one of my favourite reads of 2012, I loved that book- the world building, the characterisation, the plot, the slow building love story- so, so much that Through The Ever Night was one of my most anticipated releases of 2013. I loved it so much that I pre-ordered both the second and third books in the trilogy! I loved that book so much that the arrival of the third instalment is what promoted this month long reading challenge. I honestly don’t know why I didn’t return to this series sooner.

Despite being nearly two years since I read and reviewed Under The Never Sky (22 months to be precise), Rossi’s writing immediately transported me back in to Perry and Aria’s world. Everything I adored about Under The Never Sky, the emotions, the fast paced plot, unique world building and the healthy relationships, I found in its superb sequel, which I could help but gobble up in two delicious sittings.

Verdict: I’m kicking myself for not reading this sooner. However, I can’t help but smile delightedly at the prospect of starting Into The Still Blue tomorrow.

Publisher: Harper Collins
Publication Date:
Format: US Hardback
Pages: 341
Genre: Dystopian, romance
Age: YA
Reviewer: Caroline
Source: Own copy
Challenge: Finish It February

Posted by Caroline

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Bookish Brits: Buddy Review Of Allegiant

Veronica Roth

imageOne choice will define you.
What if your whole world was a lie?
What if a single revelation—like a single choice—changed everything?
What if love and loyalty made you do things you never expected?
The faction-based society that Tris Prior once believed in is shattered—fractured by violence and power struggles and scarred by loss and betrayal. So when offered a chance to explore the world past the limits she’s known, Tris is ready. Perhaps beyond the fence, she and Tobias will find a simple new life together, free from complicated lies, tangled loyalties, and painful memories.
But Tris’s new reality is even more alarming than the one she left behind. Old discoveries are quickly rendered meaningless. Explosive new truths change the hearts of those she loves. And once again, Tris must battle to comprehend the complexities of human nature—and of herself—while facing impossible choices about courage, allegiance, sacrifice, and love.
Told from a riveting dual perspective, Allegiant, by #1 New York Times best-selling author Veronica Roth, brings the Divergent series to a powerful conclusion while revealing the secrets of the dystopian world that has captivated millions of readers in Divergent and Insurgent.

SPOILER ALERT.
Faye and I found that most of what we wanted to discuss about Allegiant wasn’t suitable for our main review vlog, as it would completely spoil the book for anyone who hasn’t read it yet. As a result we have posted a separate video, packed to the brim with spoilers, over on the Bookish Brits tumblr ( click here to view). Please do not watch if you haven’t read the book. We also politely request that you post any spoiler comments on the tumblr post only.

Reviewed by Caroline and Faye

Publisher: Harper Collins Children’s
Publication Date: November 2013
Format: Hardback
Pages: 526
Genre: Dystopian
Age: YA
Reviewer: Caroline & Faye
Source: Provided by publisher
Challenge: None
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Allegiant

Veronica Roth

imageWhat if your whole world was a lie?
What if a single revelation – like a single choice – changed everything?
What if love and loyalty made you do things you never expected?
The faction-based society that Tris Prior once believed in is shattered – fractured by violence and power struggles and scarred by loss and betrayal. So when offered a chance to explore the world past the limits she’s known, Tris is ready. Perhaps beyond the fence, she and Tobias will find a simple new life together, free from complicated lies, tangled loyalties, and painful memories.
But Tris’s new reality is even more alarming than the one she left behind. Old discoveries are quickly rendered meaningless. Explosive new truths change the hearts of those she loves. And once again, Tris must battle to comprehend the complexities of human nature – and of herself – while facing impossible choices about courage, allegiance, sacrifice and love.

Warning contains spoilers for Divergent and Insurgent

I was soooo excited to get my hands on a copy of Allegiant to review, I had read the previous two books and, like many others, was waiting for this to come out. I devoured this in about three days, which with two young children at home is probably the fastest I have read anything recently! And is testament to the fact that I only put it down with great reluctance!

The action begins exactly from where we left it as Tris has survived and shown everyone the video that reveals startling information about the history of their city and way of life. As their world is falling part around them Tris, Tobias and their friends try to figure out what to believe, who to trust and what to do next. The faction system has fallen apart but there are those who want to return to it, others are glad to see the back of it, but the most pressing question is what is outside the fence that meant their city was constructed in the first place.

Although the continuing story of what is happening inside the city is interesting it is the story of what is outside that is predominantly the focus of this tale. As you would expect Tris and Tobias, with a few other notable characters are the first to get out and find out what is going on. What is revealed is certainly not what I expected, although I have to admit that I am not to sure what that would have been anyway!

Without wanting to totally give away the twists and turns of the plot they find a society dividing genetics into people who are deemed ok and those who are not. Chicago has been part of an experiment to fix genetically damaged people. Of course this raises hundreds of ethical questions and our characters have to come to terms with these new ideas quite quickly, and decide how they feel about the world outside and what has happened to them and their own universe.

The issues introduce plenty of friction and Tris and Tobias’ already strained relationship is put further to the test. This time the story is not solely told by Tris, Tobias gets to have his say too. At times I found the switching back and forth irritating as I would forget who was talking and have to go back and check, but on the whole I| liked hearing from both of them. It was interesting to see how Tobias sees Tris as opposed to her own views on herself! I did wonder though if this dual narrative is one of the reasons I felt the novel lacked the depth of the first two.

There is so much to find out about the outside and in the back story and I definitely still have questions that weren’t answered. Having had the first two books to get to know the characters and the faction system the same amount of time (or pages?) could easily have been given to the outside world. I would have enjoyed getting to know the characters there more and having a chance to get deeper into their situations and the whole motivation behind the project, as well as see them maybe learn a few lessons from the questioning of our main characters.

That said there is plenty to get your teeth to and the plot still has some twists and turns to keep you guessing as we would expect from Veronica. The ending is a little controversial, but for me it worked well and felt fitting to the overall story, as well as being quite refreshing, I think Veronica was brave to do this!

So despite feeling slightly unsatisfied that I didn’t get more of everything in this novel I still thoroughly enjoyed the ride and would still recommend it as a good rounding off to the trilogy.

Verdict: I only wish it could have been a quartet!

Reviewed by Helen

Publisher: Harper Collins Children’s
Publication Date: November 2013
Format: Hardback
Pages: 526
Genre: Dystopian
Age: YA
Reviewer: Helen
Source: Provided by publisher
Challenge: None
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Badness For Beginners

Ian Whybrow and Tony Ross

badness“Remember,” said Dad. “You must both be on your worst behaviour.”
In a nice smelly lair far away live the wolf family. Mum and Dad are very proud of being big and bad. They want to teach their cub, Little Wolf and Smellybreff, how to be big and bad like them.
But sometimes, lessons in Badness are not that simple…

My three year old seems to have a bit of a fascination with big, bad wolves at the moment so when I took her to the library she chose three books with wolves on the cover and this was one of them. I could tell from that front cover that this was the story that she would like best and so it has been!

The picture is of a graffiti-ed wall and Little Wolf sitting at the bottom covered in black paint whilst his brother, Smellybreff, sits at the top looking naughty with a couple of plates of food perched ready to drop on his brother. It is a perfect insight into Badness for Beginners as Mum and Dad Wolf strive to teach their little ones how to be truly naughty.

Much of the story is funny for young children as it turns on its head all those well used phrases we say to them, remember your manners, say please, don’t eat too much you’ll be sick! And so on. Smellybreff gets it straight away, but Little sometimes, shockingly, says thank you by mistake.

Mum and Dad take the young wolves out and on the way they scare people, make trip hazards and create a hole in a bridge, among other naughty things. Little is trying to impress his parents, but not quite hitting it! They go to a café and show appalling manners culminating in Smellybreff being sick and all of them getting thrown out. On the way home Mum trips on a trip hazard and knocks into Dad a hole in a bridge!!! The Little Wolves are excited about what their badness has brought about, Mum and Dad are rather quiet about it all! Need I say more!!

I had a good chuckle reading this and so did both my girls. The older one (nearly 6 years) really got it, the younger appreciated they were being naughty but did miss the point that it was their own badness that caused their downfall (literally!). But there was something in there for all of us to enjoy and the pictures helped tell the story and explain it to my little one.

Verdict: Brilliant naughty humour, a really fun read.
Reviewed by Helen

Publisher: Harper Collins
Publication Date: May 2005
Format: Paperback
Pages: 32
Genre: Humour, Manners
Age:Picture book
Reviewer: Helen
Source: Borrowed
Challenge: British book
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Model Misfit

Holly Smale
Model Misfit“My name is Harriet Manners, and I am still a geek.”
Harriet knows that modelling won’t transform you. She knows that being as uniquely odd as a polar bear isn’t necessarily a bad thing (even in a rainforest). And that the average person eats a ton of food a year, though her pregnant stepmother is doing her best to beat this.
What Harriet doesn’t know is where she’s going to fit in once the new baby arrives.
With summer plans ruined, modelling in Japan seems the perfect chance to get as far away from home as possible. But nothing can prepare Harriet for the craziness of Tokyo, her competitive model flatmates and her errant grandmother’s ‘chaperoning’. Or seeing gorgeous Nick everywhere she goes.
Because, this time, Harriet knows what a broken heart feels like.
Can geek girl find her place on the other side of the world or is Harriet lost for good?

Ok, so when I heard that there was a Geek Girl 2 I was so pleased because I am Geek girl’s biggest fan (I even have the glasses!) so pleased in fact I read it in 2 days flat. (Not quite a personal record but very close!) So Harriet Manners is 15 and she is a Geek… and a model, spotted a year ago unexpectantly by a top modelling agency (if you have no idea what I’m on about then read my last Geek Girl review) she is kind, clumsy and it’s her GCSE final today and after that she will have the whole long summer holiday ahead of her. So she does the exam and announces to her friend Nat that she has the summer holiday planned out. Nat tells her that because she was caught trying out eye shadow in Boots instead of practising her French GCSE so she has to go to a desolate farm in France to practice there. Suddenly Hattie has a lot of time on her hands…

After ruining yet another modelling opportunity she thinks her modelling career is all over until her agent tells her that she is going to Tokyo and all she has to do is convince her parents…

When she gets there she meets her Grandmother, her ex-boyfriend and some new friends… or foes. After being attacked by an octopus, getting stuck in a box with a cockroach, slipping over in a lake and wearing high-heeled shoes in a Sumo wrestling ring, I think she could say her modelling career has been well, interesting.

Find out about new friends, new enemies, new family members and a whirlwind trip to Tokyo. Boyfriends, best friends, babies, bugs and loads more in a book not to be missed!

Verdict: you will die if you don’t read this book. Enough said.

Reviewed by Daisy (12)

Publisher: Harper Collins Children’s
Publication Date: September 2013
Format: Paperback
Pages: 356
Genre: Contemporary, Humour
Age: YA
Reviewer: Daisy(12)
Source: Provided by publisher
Challenge: British book
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