Posts Tagged ‘Publisher-Little Tiger Press’

Don’t Wake The Bear Hare

Steve Smallman and Caroline Pedler

Don’t Wake The Bear HareIt was Spring Party Day, the best day of the year,
So why were all the animals trembling with fear?

Bear has gone to sleep in a tree very near where the animals are planning to have their Spring party. The animals think that bears are scary and are terrified of waking him up so they set about their party preparations as quietly as they can. As they totter back and forth with noisy crockery and a slippery jelly they have the odd mishap, but when hare starts to blow up a balloon and then gets carried away and it pops what will happen when bear wakes up? Of course bear turns out to be quite different from what the animals expected and is very excited at being able to join in with the party.

This is a sweet, rhyming story that my girls like to join in with, they enjoy wondering what bear will do, the anticipation of the balloon bursting and then the party at the end. The pictures are charming, light hearted and weave in beautifully with the text. There is plenty to look at and enjoy. I also liked the uses of different sizes of text in the book, it definitely makes it easy to read aloud with lots of emphasis and drama.

Verdict: This is a lovely story and fun for younger children.

Publisher: Little Tiger Press
Publication Date: January 2011
Format: Paperback
Pages: 32
Genre: Picture book
Age: Picture book
Reviewer: Helen
Source: Own Copy (Booktrust)
Challenge: British book
Posted on:

Dragon Stew

Steve Smallman and Lee Wildish (Illustrator)

Five bored Vikings went out hiking, looking for adventure, something daring, bold and new. So they thought they’d hunt a dragon, and tie it to their wagon, take it home and chop it up and make a dragon stew! But when the Vikings set off to find their dragon, they get a BIG surprise

We have just acquired this book and we love it! It has been read most nights since we got it, and we still giggle every time. As you can see from the above it is written in rhyme and is really easy to read aloud. The pictures are brightly coloured, with lots of detail and humour and they back up the story fantastically well.

The Vikings load up their boat and go to hunt down a dragon when they are bored one day. None of them actually even know what a dragon is! They take sardine sandwiches (the picture shows us that the sardines may still be alive!) and set off in their Viking boat with things to catch a dragon. Among the things they take is a poking stick, this is seen to be a long pole with a silly hand tied on to literally poke the dragon. On the way they scare off a squid by holding up smelly socks and tie themselves to a killer whale to hitch a lift. Eventually they find their dragon, not that they realise it as they climb up his scales, and then they get more than they bargained for.

You may guess from all this that the humour is quite silly, the mention of stinky socks and dragon poo is all it takes to make many a pre-schooler laugh and the writer has used this to best advantage. The escapades of the Vikings are all a bit nutty, and what happens to their bottoms in the end is ingenious. If you like to be very proper with your children this may not be for you, but it is not obtuse, and as the dragon really has the upper hand you may even find a good moral in this story.

Verdict: A brilliantly silly, funny read, it will be loved by children and read repeatedly

Reviewed by Helen

Publisher: Little Tiger Press
Publication Date: August 2010
Format: Paperback
Pages: 32
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Picture Books, Early Readers
Reviewer: Helen
Source: Own Copy
Challenge: N/A
Posted on:

The Very Lazy Ladybird

Isobel Finn and Jack Tickle‏

The very lazy ladybird likes to sleep all day and all night. And because she sleeps all day and all night, she doesn’t know how to fly. One day, she decides she wants to sleep somewhere else, so hops onto a kangaroo, but that’s too bouncy, the tiger is too noisy, but the elephant’s trunk is great

This is a very popular book in our house. It’s well written and we love the illustrations. But the most exciting thing is… the sound effects! They are just fabulous! Even my (much) older boys hover around when this book is being read and have each taken the time to read it to the younger ones before. I’m convinced it’s because ‘they’ want to press the buttons!

The lazy ladybird just wants to sleep and is so lazy that she doesn’t know how to fly and so she hops on to various animals in order to find somewhere else to sleep. Each animal does something that means she can’t sleep and therefore has to move on to another until, at last, she has no choice but to fly.

Each page is beautifully illustrated. The pictures are bright and colourful and each animal is drawn to look friendly and smiley. On each page there is a ‘button’ to press to hear the sound that accompanies each animal. We have read books similar to this and have found it most frustrating to be pressing the page in earnest trying to elicit a sound and not having much success. This book has been well put together however (and I mean that in the literal physical sense) as each sound works and works well without having to press over and over again. My pre-schooler has to apply a little more pressure with his tinier fingers but is fairly easily able to make the sounds work by himself too, which gives him a lot of pleasure. The sounds are loud enough and clear and fun. They make us giggle. The last sound, when ladybird has run out of choices is really fun and gets the most ‘airtime’ for sure!

A very lovely read, with great pictures and fabulous sounds. It’s one that my husband and I both love reading to our two little boys (almost 3 and 15 months) and it gets extra marks for drawing in my older boys (11 and almost 14) to read to their younger brothers without being asked!

Verdict: One for every pre-schooler’s bookshelf. There are other ‘noisy picture books’ in the series and we shall certainly be adding to the one we already have!

Reviewed by Lesley

Publisher: Little Tiger Press
Publication Date: June 2000
Format: Paperback
Pages: 32
Genre: Picture Book
Age: Preschool
Reviewer: Lesley
Source: Own Copy
Challenge: N/A
Posted on:

Small Mouse Big City

Small Mouse Big City

Simon Prescott

Country Mouse is going on an adventure! He’s leaving his quiet countryside to stay with his friend in the Big City. But when Country Mouse looks across the rooftops and sees the green hills of his home, he begins to feel sad.

This book is beautifully illustrated, the drawings are stunning, and clever too. They are used in lots of different ways to help tell the story with some pages having four or even eight drawings and others having one picture on a full two page spread. I particularly like the depiction of the big city as small mouse sees it, you have to turn the book round so it is vertical and mouse is tiny, standing at the bottom looking up at the enormous sky scrapers, it even makes me feel small! It seems to resonate with a child’s eye view of the world too.

Once you have finished admiring the pictures there is also a sweet and thought provoking story. It encompasses many ideas; what it means to have a friend, sharing experiences, being afraid, being lonely, doing something new, going on holiday. Mouse discovers many things on his visit to the city and a younger child can relate to lots of them, and might like to talk about them. However this might make it a book to read when you have a bit of time, even more so if you have a child like mine who loves to ask ‘why?’. This story isn’t necessarily one for a quick bedtime read.

The heart of the message of this tale is that it is great and exciting to have, and specifically share, new experiences, but it is at least equally important to come home. This enables children to safely explore their feelings about going away and returning home again. It is an old idea, but told in a fresh way.

Verdict: This book may not be read repeatedly by your child, but when it is picked up it will definitely be enjoyed.

Reviewed by Helen

Publisher: Little Tiger Press
Publication Date: January 2010
Format: Paperback
Pages: 32
Genre: Picture Books
Age: Picture Books, Early Readers
Reviewer: Helen
Source: Own Copy
Challenge: N/A
Posted on: